Aspects of the history of copper mining in Namaqualand

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Smalberger, John M en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-10T06:55:45Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-10T06:55:45Z
dc.date.issued 1969 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Smalberger, J. 1969. Aspects of the history of copper mining in Namaqualand. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17619
dc.description.abstract In undertaking this work, the object has been to present a picture of Namaqualand and its mines. This picture is by no means complete, but it is hoped that the pages which follow will in a small way contribute something to the history of Namaqualand. The first chapter deals with the early explorations. Not all of the early travellers to Namaqualand have been mentioned, since not all have had anything of significance to say on the development of the copper mines. Nothing is said of Le Vaillant and John Barrow, to name but two. What we have attempted to show is that, from the very earliest times of European settlement at the Cape, the existence of copper in Namaqualand was known, but that the difficulties of transport prohibited the development of these mines. The second chapter deals with the story of the South African Mining Company. This company was the first mining concern actually to commence operations in Namaqualand, and the first public mining company in South African history. It is for these reasons that its development has been dealt with so extensively. The third chapter deals with the copper mining mania of the 1850's. All too often, the very existence of such a boom is forgotten. Its importance lies in the fact that it was the first purely speculative boom of any extent in the history of South Africa. It marked South Africa's emergence into one of the typical features of a modern economy. The fourth chapter is concerned with the question of leases. The reason for devoting special attention to this is that the final settlement of the lease questions involving the vesting of mineral rights to the mission ground in the state, has been a factor contributing to the present state of conditions existing in these stations. It is a matter of interest, but also of regret, that the development of Namaqualand's mineral wealth was in many respects disastrous for the original inhabitants of the territory. The fifth chapter deals with the transport problem from 1852 until 1876, when the Cape Copper Mining Company constructed its railway. Transport was, and still is, the most important obstacle to the exploitation of Namaqualand's mineral wealth. The first part of the sixth chapter deals with the development of the industry from the commencement of the Cape Copper Company's railway, until 1937, when the O'okiep Copper Company commenced operations. This is rather a long period, and one about which not much is known. An absence of company records has made this section rather impressionistic. The second part of this chapter deals with the history of the O'okiep Copper Company, a company which is still in existence, and which has at present production rates, a life of some ten years. Like its predecessors, the Cape Copper Company and the Namaqua Copper Company, a foreign based organization, its role in the development of Namaqualand is uncertain. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Economic History en_ZA
dc.title Aspects of the history of copper mining in Namaqualand en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Smalberger, J. M. (1969). <i>Aspects of the history of copper mining in Namaqualand</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17619 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Smalberger, John M. <i>"Aspects of the history of copper mining in Namaqualand."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 1969. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17619 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Smalberger JM. Aspects of the history of copper mining in Namaqualand. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 1969 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17619 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Smalberger, John M AB - In undertaking this work, the object has been to present a picture of Namaqualand and its mines. This picture is by no means complete, but it is hoped that the pages which follow will in a small way contribute something to the history of Namaqualand. The first chapter deals with the early explorations. Not all of the early travellers to Namaqualand have been mentioned, since not all have had anything of significance to say on the development of the copper mines. Nothing is said of Le Vaillant and John Barrow, to name but two. What we have attempted to show is that, from the very earliest times of European settlement at the Cape, the existence of copper in Namaqualand was known, but that the difficulties of transport prohibited the development of these mines. The second chapter deals with the story of the South African Mining Company. This company was the first mining concern actually to commence operations in Namaqualand, and the first public mining company in South African history. It is for these reasons that its development has been dealt with so extensively. The third chapter deals with the copper mining mania of the 1850's. All too often, the very existence of such a boom is forgotten. Its importance lies in the fact that it was the first purely speculative boom of any extent in the history of South Africa. It marked South Africa's emergence into one of the typical features of a modern economy. The fourth chapter is concerned with the question of leases. The reason for devoting special attention to this is that the final settlement of the lease questions involving the vesting of mineral rights to the mission ground in the state, has been a factor contributing to the present state of conditions existing in these stations. It is a matter of interest, but also of regret, that the development of Namaqualand's mineral wealth was in many respects disastrous for the original inhabitants of the territory. The fifth chapter deals with the transport problem from 1852 until 1876, when the Cape Copper Mining Company constructed its railway. Transport was, and still is, the most important obstacle to the exploitation of Namaqualand's mineral wealth. The first part of the sixth chapter deals with the development of the industry from the commencement of the Cape Copper Company's railway, until 1937, when the O'okiep Copper Company commenced operations. This is rather a long period, and one about which not much is known. An absence of company records has made this section rather impressionistic. The second part of this chapter deals with the history of the O'okiep Copper Company, a company which is still in existence, and which has at present production rates, a life of some ten years. Like its predecessors, the Cape Copper Company and the Namaqua Copper Company, a foreign based organization, its role in the development of Namaqualand is uncertain. DA - 1969 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1969 T1 - Aspects of the history of copper mining in Namaqualand TI - Aspects of the history of copper mining in Namaqualand UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17619 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record