Teacher responses to rationalisation in the Western Cape Education Department : implications for administration planning and policy

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Soudien, Crain en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Gasant, Mogamad Waheeb en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-07T04:10:07Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-07T04:10:07Z
dc.date.issued 1998 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Gasant, M. 1998. Teacher responses to rationalisation in the Western Cape Education Department : implications for administration planning and policy. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17525
dc.description Bibliography: pages 72-78. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Apart from its current application in the process of transformation of South Africa's education system, interestingly, the term rationalisation is absent from the international literature. The high level of impact that the economics of education has in the provision of education presupposes that, in the "Global Village", world trends and access to international financial markets to fund transformation in education will inform the national policy making process. In South Africa macro education policy is set by the National ministry. In this regard teacher I learner ratios and funding to the provinces have been set at the highest level of government. In terms of this, it is understandable that national imperatives will influence and in many cases determine provincial policy making and the implementation thereof. This study examines educator responses to the way in which the rationalisation of teacher numbers is being applied in the Western Cape Education Department (WCED). The investigation takes into cognisance the particular historical, political and social background of the Western Cape Province. In doing so this study recognises the influence that these factors have had on the way teachers view the rationalisation policies and, more importantly, their implementation. In the apartheid era education was organised, according to "race", into four different departments. Thus the Department of Education (DET) controlled "Black" education, the Cape Education Department (CED) controlled "White" education, the House of Representatives (HOR) controlled "Coloured" education and the House of Delegates (HOD) was responsible for "Indian" education. Since the number of HOD teachers in the WCED only constitutes 0,47% of the total [WCED, November 1995], they were not taken into consideration for this study. While there is a convergence of opinion by educators of the three ex departments on many issues regarding rationalisation there is also a noticeable divergence underpinned by historical difference in funding and human and physical resourcing. Conclusions drawn point to the fact that there is a general acceptance of the policy of the rationalisation of teacher numbers in the Western Cape. Yet, while this policy might promote equality of numbers, its merit as a means to assuage the demand for the equitable redressing of the injustices of the apartheid era remains questionable. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Educational Administration, Planning and Social Policy en_ZA
dc.subject.other Education and state - South Africa en_ZA
dc.subject.other Teachers - Salaries, etc - South Africa en_ZA
dc.title Teacher responses to rationalisation in the Western Cape Education Department : implications for administration planning and policy en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Educational Research en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MEd en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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