Non-racial schooling in selected Cape Town schools : language, attitudes and language learning

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Young, D N en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Schlebusch, Anne en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-04T16:50:00Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-04T16:50:00Z
dc.date.issued 1994 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Schlebusch, A. 1994. Non-racial schooling in selected Cape Town schools : language, attitudes and language learning. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17504
dc.description Bibliography: pages 111-118. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This study examines some elements of the language environment, language learning processes, and language inter-actions between child and teacher, and child and child in the changing South African education system. As more classrooms become non-racial, new dimensions are arising in language use and in learning: classrooms are perforce multilingual as different language groups come together to receive instruction through the medium of English. What dynamic do these multilingual elements bring to the standard classroom? I focus on part of the Standard Six population of 5 Western Cape English medium schools. The schools are different in many respects and similar in others; some have more Black pupils than others. By using a variety of research methods, including questionnaires, worksheets, personal observation, interviews and essays, I explore the experiences and attitudes of pupils, teachers and principals. My object is to try to identify trends: to look for positive features arising out of present classrooms and to look for possible points of tension as well, in order to extract central features to analyse. These are highlighted, and cross-referenced with relevant international studies, as matters of interest for practitioners in the classroom and for education planners. The field is immense: the study essentially provides a broad-based platform for further research. I tried not to have any preconceptions about what I would find, so made it a comprehensive and far-ranging study. It uncovers important elements which teachers and schools may attend to, relatively easily, indicates the importance of development of one's Mother Tongue and exposes deeply-felt emotions about Language and identity. It asks questions about Bridging Programmes and about the language of the teacher in the classroom and in testing. I also ask about the future of English in this country, about feelings about learning Afrikaans and about learning Xhosa. The main target in the recommendations is the teacher, as the generator of learning opportunities in the classroom. I call for more specific communication between teacher and pupil and the evolution of child-specific language learning processes. It is every teacher in every classroom who needs to adjust consciously to the new classroom profiles. Differing patterns clearly emerge from the schools with different intake profiles. This suggests the need for further studies to examine these findings for generalisability. The situation in schools is both volatile and exciting, calling for concrete and imaginative attention to aspects emerging from the personal, perceptive and wide-ranging input of the sample studied in this research project. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Education - South Africa en_ZA
dc.subject.other School integration en_ZA
dc.subject.other Language and education en_ZA
dc.subject.other Applied Language Studies en_ZA
dc.title Non-racial schooling in selected Cape Town schools : language, attitudes and language learning en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Education en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Schlebusch, A. (1994). <i>Non-racial schooling in selected Cape Town schools : language, attitudes and language learning</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17504 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Schlebusch, Anne. <i>"Non-racial schooling in selected Cape Town schools : language, attitudes and language learning."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education, 1994. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17504 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Schlebusch A. Non-racial schooling in selected Cape Town schools : language, attitudes and language learning. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education, 1994 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17504 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Schlebusch, Anne AB - This study examines some elements of the language environment, language learning processes, and language inter-actions between child and teacher, and child and child in the changing South African education system. As more classrooms become non-racial, new dimensions are arising in language use and in learning: classrooms are perforce multilingual as different language groups come together to receive instruction through the medium of English. What dynamic do these multilingual elements bring to the standard classroom? I focus on part of the Standard Six population of 5 Western Cape English medium schools. The schools are different in many respects and similar in others; some have more Black pupils than others. By using a variety of research methods, including questionnaires, worksheets, personal observation, interviews and essays, I explore the experiences and attitudes of pupils, teachers and principals. My object is to try to identify trends: to look for positive features arising out of present classrooms and to look for possible points of tension as well, in order to extract central features to analyse. These are highlighted, and cross-referenced with relevant international studies, as matters of interest for practitioners in the classroom and for education planners. The field is immense: the study essentially provides a broad-based platform for further research. I tried not to have any preconceptions about what I would find, so made it a comprehensive and far-ranging study. It uncovers important elements which teachers and schools may attend to, relatively easily, indicates the importance of development of one's Mother Tongue and exposes deeply-felt emotions about Language and identity. It asks questions about Bridging Programmes and about the language of the teacher in the classroom and in testing. I also ask about the future of English in this country, about feelings about learning Afrikaans and about learning Xhosa. The main target in the recommendations is the teacher, as the generator of learning opportunities in the classroom. I call for more specific communication between teacher and pupil and the evolution of child-specific language learning processes. It is every teacher in every classroom who needs to adjust consciously to the new classroom profiles. Differing patterns clearly emerge from the schools with different intake profiles. This suggests the need for further studies to examine these findings for generalisability. The situation in schools is both volatile and exciting, calling for concrete and imaginative attention to aspects emerging from the personal, perceptive and wide-ranging input of the sample studied in this research project. DA - 1994 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1994 T1 - Non-racial schooling in selected Cape Town schools : language, attitudes and language learning TI - Non-racial schooling in selected Cape Town schools : language, attitudes and language learning UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17504 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record