The forms, functions and techniques of Xhosa humour

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Satyo, S C en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Gowlett, Derek F en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Dowling, Tessa en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-04T16:37:09Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-04T16:37:09Z
dc.date.issued 1996 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Dowling, T. 1996. The forms, functions and techniques of Xhosa humour. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17456
dc.description Bibliography: pages 259-274. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract In this thesis I examine the way in which Xhosa speakers create humour, what forms (e.g. satire, irony, punning, parody) they favour in both oral and textual literature, and the genres in which these forms are delivered and executed. The functions of Xhosa humour, both during and after apartheid, are examined, as is its role in challenging, contesting and reaffirming traditional notions of society and culture. The particular techniques Xhosa comedians and comic writers use in order to elicit humour are explored with specific reference to the way in which the phonological complexity of this language is exploited for humorous effect. Oral literature sources include collections of praise poems, folktales and proverbs, while anecdotal humour is drawn from recent interviews conducted with domestic workers. My analysis of humour in literary texts initially focuses on the classic works of G.B. Sinxo and S.M. Burns-Ncamashe, and then goes on to refer to contemporary works such as those of P.T. Mtuze. The study on the techniques of Xhosa humour uses as its theoretical base Walter Nash's The language of humour (1985), while that on the functions of Xhosa humour owes much to the work of sociologists such as Michael Mulkay and Chris Powell and George E.C. Paton. The study reveals the fact that Xhosa oral humour is personal and playful - at times obscene - but can also be critical. In texts it explores the comedy of characters as well as the irony of socio-political realities. In both oral and textual discourses the phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics of Xhosa are exploited to create a humour which is richly patterned and finely crafted. In South Africa humour often served to liberate people from the oppressive atmosphere of apartheid. At the same time humour has always had a stabilizing role in Xhosa cultural life, providing a means of controlling deviants and misfits. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other African Languages and Literatures en_ZA
dc.subject.other Humour in literature. en_ZA
dc.subject.other Folk poetry, Xhosa. en_ZA
dc.subject.other Xhosa (African people) - Humour. en_ZA
dc.subject.other Oral tradition - South Africa en_ZA
dc.title The forms, functions and techniques of Xhosa humour en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department African Languages and Literatures en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Dowling, T. (1996). <i>The forms, functions and techniques of Xhosa humour</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Languages and Literatures. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17456 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Dowling, Tessa. <i>"The forms, functions and techniques of Xhosa humour."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Languages and Literatures, 1996. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17456 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Dowling T. The forms, functions and techniques of Xhosa humour. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,African Languages and Literatures, 1996 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17456 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Dowling, Tessa AB - In this thesis I examine the way in which Xhosa speakers create humour, what forms (e.g. satire, irony, punning, parody) they favour in both oral and textual literature, and the genres in which these forms are delivered and executed. The functions of Xhosa humour, both during and after apartheid, are examined, as is its role in challenging, contesting and reaffirming traditional notions of society and culture. The particular techniques Xhosa comedians and comic writers use in order to elicit humour are explored with specific reference to the way in which the phonological complexity of this language is exploited for humorous effect. Oral literature sources include collections of praise poems, folktales and proverbs, while anecdotal humour is drawn from recent interviews conducted with domestic workers. My analysis of humour in literary texts initially focuses on the classic works of G.B. Sinxo and S.M. Burns-Ncamashe, and then goes on to refer to contemporary works such as those of P.T. Mtuze. The study on the techniques of Xhosa humour uses as its theoretical base Walter Nash's The language of humour (1985), while that on the functions of Xhosa humour owes much to the work of sociologists such as Michael Mulkay and Chris Powell and George E.C. Paton. The study reveals the fact that Xhosa oral humour is personal and playful - at times obscene - but can also be critical. In texts it explores the comedy of characters as well as the irony of socio-political realities. In both oral and textual discourses the phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics of Xhosa are exploited to create a humour which is richly patterned and finely crafted. In South Africa humour often served to liberate people from the oppressive atmosphere of apartheid. At the same time humour has always had a stabilizing role in Xhosa cultural life, providing a means of controlling deviants and misfits. DA - 1996 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1996 T1 - The forms, functions and techniques of Xhosa humour TI - The forms, functions and techniques of Xhosa humour UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17456 ER - en_ZA


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