The dynamics of cultural continuities : clanship in the Western Cape

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Spiegel, Andrew David en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mehlwana, Anthony M en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-04T16:35:57Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-04T16:35:57Z
dc.date.issued 1996 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mehlwana, A. 1996. The dynamics of cultural continuities : clanship in the Western Cape. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17448
dc.description Bibliography: pages. 106-111. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This thesis came as a result of two years' research in ten households in Makhaza. Makhaza is a shantytown situated in the Khayelitsha complex. The focus of this research is clanship a particularly under researched field in contemporary anthropology in southern Africa. The early anthropological literature mentioned clanship notions only in the context of social group formation. This literature argued that clanship is meaningless in urban situations since there are various social groups in urban towns which are based on criteria other than clanship. The present study argues, however, that clanship continues to be a building block in the construction of many relationships that poor Africans in towns manipulate for many purposes. Clanship manipulation should be understood in the context of the history and the poor conditions under which urban Africans live. As a result of the often forced migration, many Africans in urban areas do not live with their immediate families. In order to adapt to these conditions, they commonly build contingent relationships that they use as resources for reciprocal exchanges. This thesis has looked at these contingent relationships on three levels: a) how they are formed; b) the roles that each social actor is supposed to perform; and c) reciprocal exchange between households which are linked by clanship. It argues that clanship is a powerful symbol which binds these relationships. Clanship relationships are perceived as 'blood' relationships which are culturally defined and that underpin many varied relationships of reciprocity and material assistance among Africans. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Social Anthropology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Clanship en_ZA
dc.title The dynamics of cultural continuities : clanship in the Western Cape en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Social Anthropology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSocSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mehlwana, A. M. (1996). <i>The dynamics of cultural continuities : clanship in the Western Cape</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17448 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mehlwana, Anthony M. <i>"The dynamics of cultural continuities : clanship in the Western Cape."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology, 1996. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17448 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mehlwana AM. The dynamics of cultural continuities : clanship in the Western Cape. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology, 1996 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17448 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mehlwana, Anthony M AB - This thesis came as a result of two years' research in ten households in Makhaza. Makhaza is a shantytown situated in the Khayelitsha complex. The focus of this research is clanship a particularly under researched field in contemporary anthropology in southern Africa. The early anthropological literature mentioned clanship notions only in the context of social group formation. This literature argued that clanship is meaningless in urban situations since there are various social groups in urban towns which are based on criteria other than clanship. The present study argues, however, that clanship continues to be a building block in the construction of many relationships that poor Africans in towns manipulate for many purposes. Clanship manipulation should be understood in the context of the history and the poor conditions under which urban Africans live. As a result of the often forced migration, many Africans in urban areas do not live with their immediate families. In order to adapt to these conditions, they commonly build contingent relationships that they use as resources for reciprocal exchanges. This thesis has looked at these contingent relationships on three levels: a) how they are formed; b) the roles that each social actor is supposed to perform; and c) reciprocal exchange between households which are linked by clanship. It argues that clanship is a powerful symbol which binds these relationships. Clanship relationships are perceived as 'blood' relationships which are culturally defined and that underpin many varied relationships of reciprocity and material assistance among Africans. DA - 1996 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1996 T1 - The dynamics of cultural continuities : clanship in the Western Cape TI - The dynamics of cultural continuities : clanship in the Western Cape UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17448 ER - en_ZA


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