Soluble expression of plasmodium falciparum glutamine synthetase and three-dimensional structure by single particle reconstruction

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Sewell, Trevor en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Patel, Satishkumar Ishverlal en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-03T14:46:28Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-03T14:46:28Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Patel, S. 2015. Soluble expression of plasmodium falciparum glutamine synthetase and three-dimensional structure by single particle reconstruction. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17429
dc.description Includes bibliographical references en_ZA
dc.description.abstract [No subject] Malaria infection caused by the apicomplexa pathogen Plasmodium falciparum has a high rate of resistance to existing anti-malarial drugs. The World Health Organisation recommended interventions are unlikely to eliminate the growth of resistance and it would therefore be prudent to continue the search for new drug targets for the continued combatting of malaria. Plasmodium falciparum is parasitic on the host for its metabolites and therefore inhibiting the transportation of glutamine from the host, has long been considered a potential strategy for combating the spread of infection. The recently sequenced Plasmodium falciparum genome has however shown that pathways for independent survival are also conserved. Therefore, combating the spread of Plasmodium falciparum in the human host, in addition to inhibiting the transportation of glutamine, will also require the inhibition of the de novo expression of essential amino acids within the Plasmodium falciparum cell. This could be achieved by inhibiting the glutamine synthetase gene, which is an essential step in the tri-carboxylic acid cycle. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Malaria en_ZA
dc.subject.other Plasmodium falciparum en_ZA
dc.title Soluble expression of plasmodium falciparum glutamine synthetase and three-dimensional structure by single particle reconstruction en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc (Med) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Patel, S. I. (2015). <i>Soluble expression of plasmodium falciparum glutamine synthetase and three-dimensional structure by single particle reconstruction</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17429 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Patel, Satishkumar Ishverlal. <i>"Soluble expression of plasmodium falciparum glutamine synthetase and three-dimensional structure by single particle reconstruction."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17429 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Patel SI. Soluble expression of plasmodium falciparum glutamine synthetase and three-dimensional structure by single particle reconstruction. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 2015 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17429 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Patel, Satishkumar Ishverlal AB - [No subject] Malaria infection caused by the apicomplexa pathogen Plasmodium falciparum has a high rate of resistance to existing anti-malarial drugs. The World Health Organisation recommended interventions are unlikely to eliminate the growth of resistance and it would therefore be prudent to continue the search for new drug targets for the continued combatting of malaria. Plasmodium falciparum is parasitic on the host for its metabolites and therefore inhibiting the transportation of glutamine from the host, has long been considered a potential strategy for combating the spread of infection. The recently sequenced Plasmodium falciparum genome has however shown that pathways for independent survival are also conserved. Therefore, combating the spread of Plasmodium falciparum in the human host, in addition to inhibiting the transportation of glutamine, will also require the inhibition of the de novo expression of essential amino acids within the Plasmodium falciparum cell. This could be achieved by inhibiting the glutamine synthetase gene, which is an essential step in the tri-carboxylic acid cycle. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Soluble expression of plasmodium falciparum glutamine synthetase and three-dimensional structure by single particle reconstruction TI - Soluble expression of plasmodium falciparum glutamine synthetase and three-dimensional structure by single particle reconstruction UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17429 ER - en_ZA


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