Dual exchange rates : theory, insulation properties and the South African experience

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Kahn, Brian en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Galloway, D W en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-26T07:17:32Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-26T07:17:32Z
dc.date.issued 1990 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Galloway, D. 1990. Dual exchange rates : theory, insulation properties and the South African experience. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17271
dc.description Includes bibliographies. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Dual exchange rate regimes are not a phenomenon peculiar only to South Africa. In the past they have been implemented by the BLEU, France, Italy and the Netherlands in one form or another. More recently, multiple exchange regimes have been adopted by other developing countries such as Mexico, Brazil, Venezuela and Argentina. The rationale for imposing a two- or multi-tier exchange regime is to protect the balance of payments from volatile short-term capital flows due to political and economic uncertainty inherent in developing economies. The focus of this paper is on the insulation properties of dual market systems against foreign shocks. These shocks may take the form of foreign interest rate increases or increases in foreign perceptions of risk. An implication of these insulation properties is that the monetary authorities are able to pursue a monetary policy independent of external constraints. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Foreign Exchange en_ZA
dc.title Dual exchange rates : theory, insulation properties and the South African experience en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Economics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MCom en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Galloway, D. W. (1990). <i>Dual exchange rates : theory, insulation properties and the South African experience</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17271 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Galloway, D W. <i>"Dual exchange rates : theory, insulation properties and the South African experience."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics, 1990. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17271 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Galloway DW. Dual exchange rates : theory, insulation properties and the South African experience. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics, 1990 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17271 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Galloway, D W AB - Dual exchange rate regimes are not a phenomenon peculiar only to South Africa. In the past they have been implemented by the BLEU, France, Italy and the Netherlands in one form or another. More recently, multiple exchange regimes have been adopted by other developing countries such as Mexico, Brazil, Venezuela and Argentina. The rationale for imposing a two- or multi-tier exchange regime is to protect the balance of payments from volatile short-term capital flows due to political and economic uncertainty inherent in developing economies. The focus of this paper is on the insulation properties of dual market systems against foreign shocks. These shocks may take the form of foreign interest rate increases or increases in foreign perceptions of risk. An implication of these insulation properties is that the monetary authorities are able to pursue a monetary policy independent of external constraints. DA - 1990 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1990 T1 - Dual exchange rates : theory, insulation properties and the South African experience TI - Dual exchange rates : theory, insulation properties and the South African experience UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17271 ER - en_ZA


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