Embodied relevance: exploring the potential of existing concrete frame structures: the case of the Christiaan Barnard Hospital

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Fellingham, Kevin en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Zimmermann, Sophie en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-22T11:13:55Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-22T11:13:55Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Zimmermann, S. 2015. Embodied relevance: exploring the potential of existing concrete frame structures: the case of the Christiaan Barnard Hospital. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17202
dc.description Includes bibliographical references en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Our cities to a great part consist of a large amount of already built fabric and this dissertation shall address this as an area of concern, encouraging the transformation of existing buildings, rather than building anew. Furthermore, the dissertation focuses on the universal issue of 1960's concrete frame buildings and investigates the potential for their continued re-use rather than demolition. This falls within the current discourse around the negative impact of the built environment and its contribution to climate change, and forms the backbone of the intended research. While progress has been made towards achieving urban sustainability in practical and conceptual terms, cities are still unsustainable. Buildings have a large negative impact on the environment in terms of the natural resources and energy that they consume, as well as the CO2 emitted throughout their lifespan. For environmental, architectural and economic reasons this dissertation investigates the applicability and process for the transformation and/or rehabilitation of existing buildings - to retain the existing embodied energy, while also focusing on adapting buildings to become more energy efficient. It is difficult to develop a fixed set of rules for retrofitting or rehabilitating existing buildings as they are all unique by definition. However, the general idea of retaining the embodied energy and actively engaging with the existing should be apparent throughout, encouraging environmental consciousness and bringing new life and purpose to the building. In the case of the Christiaan Barnard Hospital, this was done through retaining the bulk of the existing concrete frame (86%), while enhancing the internal quality of the building through the incorporation of light wells and various cuts and punctures throughout. While increasing occupancy wellbeing, this also allows for a comfortable interior climate through passive means and will improve the energy efficiency of the building, which is coupled with the energy savings from retaining the concrete frame. Additionally, a lightweight modular steel frame structure with movable mesh screens was incorporated into the building's façade to provide a fresh new look and allow for an interplay between the old and the new, while providing natural light, ventilation and shading. The functional changes in the building also allow for the reintegration of the building into the Cape Town CBD as a building that will now contribute to its surroundings. Thus, the design explores and strives to serve as a precedent for a methodology for sustainable building refurbishment. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Architectural Studies en_ZA
dc.title Embodied relevance: exploring the potential of existing concrete frame structures: the case of the Christiaan Barnard Hospital en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MArch (Prof) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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