"Development first" in the G-20 and the BRICS? Reflections on Brazil’s foreign politics and civil society

 

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dc.contributor.author Rennkamp, Britta
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-19T09:47:51Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-19T09:47:51Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Rennkamp, B. (2013). "Development First" in the G-20 and the BRICS? Reflections on Brazil’s foreign politics and civil society. Inside a champion: In Heinrich Böll Foundation (Ed.), An Analysis of the Brazilian Development Model, (pp. 156-170). Rio de Janeiro: Heinrich Böll Stiftung. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17147
dc.description.abstract Ever since the Workers’ Party (PT) came to power in 2002, analysts have been puzzled by Brazil’s economic and foreign policies. Even the harshest critics of former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva praised his foreign policy strategy, which seemed to truly reflect the ideals of the Workers’ Party in defending national sovereignty, solidarity between developing countries, and Latin American integrity. On the other hand, Lula’s economic policy choices upset many of his supporters, who saw them as not being faithful to the PT’s beliefs (Bourne 2008). Lula’s background (he was from a poor family in the northeast, a militant, and a steelworker unionist) led to high expectations for improvements in the lives of the poorest. At the same time, international investors panicked when the leftist leader was first elected. This essay explores the entanglement between economic policy and foreign policy and the tradeoffs between developmental choices. It looks at foreign and economic policies and Brazil’s engagement in various economic groups: G-20; BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa); BASIC (Brazil, South Africa, India, China); and IBSA (India, Brazil, South Africa). The essay proposes two main arguments. Firstly, although the PT’s foreign politics received wide appraisal among scholars and analysts, Lula’s strategy consistently supported his controversial economic development policy. Whenever environmental and social costs clashed, the PT administration pursued a clear approach to “development first.” The conservative interpretation of “development first” created controversy among the party’s supporters. en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-NoDerivatives
dc.rights.uri http://creative-commons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.title "Development first" in the G-20 and the BRICS? Reflections on Brazil’s foreign politics and civil society en_ZA
dc.type Chapter in Book en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-02-11T12:01:41Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Chapter en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Energy Research Centre en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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