Oversight in local government in South Africa : a case study of the Ombudman's office for the City of Cape Town

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Naidoo, Goonasaigree en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Butler, Anthony en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Nagia-Luddy, Fairouz en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-18T12:13:22Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-18T12:13:22Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Nagia-Luddy, F. 2009. Oversight in local government in South Africa : a case study of the Ombudman's office for the City of Cape Town. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17108
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 88-92). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The municipal ombud is a relatively new concept in South Africa and only two municipal ombud offices currently operate within the country. While there is a growing body of literature on the organisational ombud, as well as established works on various classical ombud, the practice of 'ombudsing' within local government currently enjoys no consistent or comprehensive theoretical foundation, particularly in relation to the required structure or processes, institutional support systems, or legal frameworks for the effective or optimal operation of an institution of this nature. The ombud at the local level calls for a hybrid approach to the ombud practice, and further requires particular arrangements to ensure the independence and credibility of the institution. This paper explores some of these critical factors required for the effective operation of an ombud, such as its 'independence' and 'credibility'. Linked to these factors, are aspects relating to the ombud's 'accountability'. Whereas the office has to ensure organisational accountability to the public, it also has to report to the host organisation. The result is a form of dual accountability, which means that the office needs to optimise its credibility and legitimacy both in the public realm, and within the host organisation. This dissertation argues that while such paradoxes are not uncommon to oversight institutions, numerous problems arise as a result of the lack of a clear and coherent approach, and the lack of understanding of the basic requirements for the ombud's effective or optimal functioning. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Public Policy en_ZA
dc.title Oversight in local government in South Africa : a case study of the Ombudman's office for the City of Cape Town en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Political Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Nagia-Luddy, F. (2009). <i>Oversight in local government in South Africa : a case study of the Ombudman's office for the City of Cape Town</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Political Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17108 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Nagia-Luddy, Fairouz. <i>"Oversight in local government in South Africa : a case study of the Ombudman's office for the City of Cape Town."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Political Studies, 2009. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17108 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Nagia-Luddy F. Oversight in local government in South Africa : a case study of the Ombudman's office for the City of Cape Town. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Political Studies, 2009 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17108 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Nagia-Luddy, Fairouz AB - The municipal ombud is a relatively new concept in South Africa and only two municipal ombud offices currently operate within the country. While there is a growing body of literature on the organisational ombud, as well as established works on various classical ombud, the practice of 'ombudsing' within local government currently enjoys no consistent or comprehensive theoretical foundation, particularly in relation to the required structure or processes, institutional support systems, or legal frameworks for the effective or optimal operation of an institution of this nature. The ombud at the local level calls for a hybrid approach to the ombud practice, and further requires particular arrangements to ensure the independence and credibility of the institution. This paper explores some of these critical factors required for the effective operation of an ombud, such as its 'independence' and 'credibility'. Linked to these factors, are aspects relating to the ombud's 'accountability'. Whereas the office has to ensure organisational accountability to the public, it also has to report to the host organisation. The result is a form of dual accountability, which means that the office needs to optimise its credibility and legitimacy both in the public realm, and within the host organisation. This dissertation argues that while such paradoxes are not uncommon to oversight institutions, numerous problems arise as a result of the lack of a clear and coherent approach, and the lack of understanding of the basic requirements for the ombud's effective or optimal functioning. DA - 2009 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2009 T1 - Oversight in local government in South Africa : a case study of the Ombudman's office for the City of Cape Town TI - Oversight in local government in South Africa : a case study of the Ombudman's office for the City of Cape Town UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17108 ER - en_ZA


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