Equity, sustainable development and climate policy

 

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dc.contributor.author Klinsky, Sonja
dc.contributor.author Winkler, Harald
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-18T07:22:30Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-18T07:22:30Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14693062.2014.859352
dc.identifier.citation Klinsky, S., & Winkler, H. (2014). Equity, sustainable development and climate policy. Climate Policy, 14(1), 1-7. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1469-3062 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17095
dc.description.abstract Deep-seated differences about equity are not novel within the international climate policy arena. Equity has been elusive, but central, in the broader struggles to make development more sustainable and to share fairly the efforts required for development and climate policy. This special issue is intended to broaden the conversation about equity as a point of reflection in an ongoing debate. One of the reasons why equity has been both so central and so difficult to achieve within the climate arena is that it is a multi-faceted principle that needs to be applied in a dynamic context. Although the Durban Platform did not refer directly to equity or justice, its explicit recognition of the principles of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), including ‘common but differentiated responsibility and respective capabilities’ (CBDR&RC), has placed the operationalization of equity, CBDR&RC, and related concepts at the heart of negotiations leading to a 2015 agreement. The Durban Platform also saw movement towards relaxing the existing binary division of countries into two Annexes, and articulated a vision of an international climate agreement that would, in some form, be applicable to all. Both developments have occurred within a global context characterized by ongoing challenges to sustainable development and a steady increase in global GHG emissions. Together, these factors have created a context in which equity has emerged as an essential element in the negotiations of the Ad-hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform on Enhanced Action (ADP). There is a pressing need for creative and engaged thought about how best to operationalize equity and CBDR&RC within a framework capable of adequately addressing both the causes and impacts of climate change. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Taylor and Francis en_ZA
dc.source Climate Policy en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/tcpo20/current
dc.title Equity, sustainable development and climate policy en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-02-16T11:20:45Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords equity en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords sustainable development en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords climate policy en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Energy Research Centre en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Klinsky, S., & Winkler, H. (2014). Equity, sustainable development and climate policy. <i>Climate Policy</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17095 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Klinsky, Sonja, and Harald Winkler "Equity, sustainable development and climate policy." <i>Climate Policy</i> (2014) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17095 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Klinsky S, Winkler H. Equity, sustainable development and climate policy. Climate Policy. 2014; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17095. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Klinsky, Sonja AU - Winkler, Harald AB - Deep-seated differences about equity are not novel within the international climate policy arena. Equity has been elusive, but central, in the broader struggles to make development more sustainable and to share fairly the efforts required for development and climate policy. This special issue is intended to broaden the conversation about equity as a point of reflection in an ongoing debate. One of the reasons why equity has been both so central and so difficult to achieve within the climate arena is that it is a multi-faceted principle that needs to be applied in a dynamic context. Although the Durban Platform did not refer directly to equity or justice, its explicit recognition of the principles of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), including ‘common but differentiated responsibility and respective capabilities’ (CBDR&RC), has placed the operationalization of equity, CBDR&RC, and related concepts at the heart of negotiations leading to a 2015 agreement. The Durban Platform also saw movement towards relaxing the existing binary division of countries into two Annexes, and articulated a vision of an international climate agreement that would, in some form, be applicable to all. Both developments have occurred within a global context characterized by ongoing challenges to sustainable development and a steady increase in global GHG emissions. Together, these factors have created a context in which equity has emerged as an essential element in the negotiations of the Ad-hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform on Enhanced Action (ADP). There is a pressing need for creative and engaged thought about how best to operationalize equity and CBDR&RC within a framework capable of adequately addressing both the causes and impacts of climate change. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Climate Policy LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 SM - 1469-3062 T1 - Equity, sustainable development and climate policy TI - Equity, sustainable development and climate policy UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17095 ER - en_ZA


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