Religion, class and culture : indigenous churches in South Africa, with special reference to Zionist-Apostolics

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Leatt, James en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Kruss, Glenda en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-15T07:13:45Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-15T07:13:45Z
dc.date.issued 1985 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Kruss, G. 1985. Religion, class and culture : indigenous churches in South Africa, with special reference to Zionist-Apostolics. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17025
dc.description.abstract Part one establishes the problematic of this primarily historical and theoretical work on indigenous churches in South Africa. The existing literature is surveyed, explanatory themes isolated and a critique of the dominant functionalist framework offered. A different theoretical framework - historical materialism - is proposed, in order to bring new insights into the explanation of indigenous churches. A periodisation of the South African social formation, and three corresponding forms of indigenous churches is proposed. Part two considers each of these in a schematic form. It is hypothesized that Ethiopian churches arose at the turn of the century in the Transvaal and Eastern Cape amongst the emerging African petit-bourgeoisie. They were the religious response to unequal incorporation in the developing capitalist social formation. An early form of Zionism, Zion City Churches, arose between the two World Wars, in a period of intense resistance to proletarianization. In each region they were shaped by the particular conditions and conflicts. An attempt is made to demonstrate that, in contrast, Zionist-Apostolics arose after World War II as a church of the black working class. Instead of explaining them in terms of acculturation, it is hypothesized that their healing form can be understood as an expression and a protest of the alienation of the black working class. As a religious-cultural innovation they succeed in subverting missionary hegemony and gaining control over the means of salvation, and in this way, of their own lives. Part three attempts to evaluate the contribution of a historical materialist analysis to understanding religion, and to isolate directions for future research. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Religious Studies en_ZA
dc.subject.other Independent churches - South Africa en_ZA
dc.title Religion, class and culture : indigenous churches in South Africa, with special reference to Zionist-Apostolics en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Religious Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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