Occupational stress : type A behaviour as a moderator of the relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Du Preez, Peter en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Forshaw, Brendan Mark en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-15T07:12:18Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-15T07:12:18Z
dc.date.issued 1985 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Forshaw, B. 1985. Occupational stress : type A behaviour as a moderator of the relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17016
dc.description Bibliography: pages 333-360. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract To study Type A behaviour as a moderator of relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain, 234 volunteer subjects from a medium-sized life insurance society completed three questionnaires under standardized testing conditions, tapping Type A behaviour (Session 1) and various role dimensions (Session 2) and indices of strain (Session 3). Absenteeism data were taken from employee record cards, as were data for some demographic and organizational variables (race and sex), while others, (company tenure, age and organizational level) were explored in the questionnaires. Assessment sessions were staggered, with one-month intervals between each, to reduce the effects of response sets. Factor analysis of responses to the role dimensions questionnaire confirmed the hypothesized factor structure and led to the development of scales for role conflict, ambiguity, overload and qualitative underload. The reliability and validity of these scales are discussed. Partial correlations (with the linear effects of the demographic and organizational variables removed) and multiple linear regressions indicate that role conflict, ambiguity, overload and underload may be described as social-psychological stressors, in terms of psychological strain, while only underload is weakly related to absenteeism. Type A behaviour is not found to moderate relationships between stressors and strain, with the exception of an effect for underload which may be accounted for in statistical, rather than psychological, terms. Results are interpreted as evidence of the need for improved work design and redesign, particularly in South African organizations. Implications of findings with respect to sequential models of strain, as well as the nature of the relationship between Type A behaviour and CHD, are discussed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Psychology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Organisational Psychology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Stress en_ZA
dc.title Occupational stress : type A behaviour as a moderator of the relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Forshaw, B. M. (1985). <i>Occupational stress : type A behaviour as a moderator of the relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Forshaw, Brendan Mark. <i>"Occupational stress : type A behaviour as a moderator of the relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 1985. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Forshaw BM. Occupational stress : type A behaviour as a moderator of the relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 1985 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Forshaw, Brendan Mark AB - To study Type A behaviour as a moderator of relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain, 234 volunteer subjects from a medium-sized life insurance society completed three questionnaires under standardized testing conditions, tapping Type A behaviour (Session 1) and various role dimensions (Session 2) and indices of strain (Session 3). Absenteeism data were taken from employee record cards, as were data for some demographic and organizational variables (race and sex), while others, (company tenure, age and organizational level) were explored in the questionnaires. Assessment sessions were staggered, with one-month intervals between each, to reduce the effects of response sets. Factor analysis of responses to the role dimensions questionnaire confirmed the hypothesized factor structure and led to the development of scales for role conflict, ambiguity, overload and qualitative underload. The reliability and validity of these scales are discussed. Partial correlations (with the linear effects of the demographic and organizational variables removed) and multiple linear regressions indicate that role conflict, ambiguity, overload and underload may be described as social-psychological stressors, in terms of psychological strain, while only underload is weakly related to absenteeism. Type A behaviour is not found to moderate relationships between stressors and strain, with the exception of an effect for underload which may be accounted for in statistical, rather than psychological, terms. Results are interpreted as evidence of the need for improved work design and redesign, particularly in South African organizations. Implications of findings with respect to sequential models of strain, as well as the nature of the relationship between Type A behaviour and CHD, are discussed. DA - 1985 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1985 T1 - Occupational stress : type A behaviour as a moderator of the relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain TI - Occupational stress : type A behaviour as a moderator of the relationships between role demands and psychological and behavioural strain UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17016 ER - en_ZA


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