The culture of the South African sugarmill : the impress of the sugarocracy

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Jubber, Ken en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Lincoln, Mervyn David en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-15T07:05:03Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-15T07:05:03Z
dc.date.issued 1985 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Lincoln, M. 1985. The culture of the South African sugarmill : the impress of the sugarocracy. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16995
dc.description.abstract In this thesis an analysis is made of the relationship between the families which until recently controlled most of South Africa's sugarmills, and their sugarmill employees. The relationship is approached by way of a study of the culture of the sugarmill; by way, that is, of looking at the ideological and material connotations of the sugarmilling labour process as they manifested themselves in the sugar villages of South Africa. It is the principal concern of the study to demonstrate how the dynastic sugarmilling families, who are presented as a sugarocracy, impinged upon the culture of the sugarmill. By perceiving the culture of the sugarmill as evolving out of the sugarmilling labour process, a materialist interpretation of historical evidence is indicated as a method for analysing sugarocratic domination. This method is applied to empirical evidence derived primarily through literary research. A further methodological consideration is displayed in the emphasis given to causal relationships between sugarocratic influences upon the labour process and workers' responses to that process. Because of the centrality accorded to the labour process points of reference are readily found in studies of sugarmilling in other milieux. Thus each chapter of the thesis is introduced with relevant material on sugarmilling in regions where it has generally been subjected to more social analysis than has been the South African case. Arranged in three parts, the analysis begins with an account of the ascent of the sugarocracy since the turn of the twentieth century, and of the establishment and development of sugarocratic ideology and politics. In the second part, attention is focused on the sugarmill, with chapters devoted to sugar technology and the technical division of labour, the racial division of labour, and work-place control, respectively. The final part is given to an examination of life in the sugar village, and to the question of how, by means of accommodation and resistance, workers coped with the conditions under which they worked and lived. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Sociology en_ZA
dc.subject.other en_ZA
dc.title The culture of the South African sugarmill : the impress of the sugarocracy en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Sociology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Lincoln, M. D. (1985). <i>The culture of the South African sugarmill : the impress of the sugarocracy</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16995 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Lincoln, Mervyn David. <i>"The culture of the South African sugarmill : the impress of the sugarocracy."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology, 1985. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16995 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Lincoln MD. The culture of the South African sugarmill : the impress of the sugarocracy. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology, 1985 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16995 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Lincoln, Mervyn David AB - In this thesis an analysis is made of the relationship between the families which until recently controlled most of South Africa's sugarmills, and their sugarmill employees. The relationship is approached by way of a study of the culture of the sugarmill; by way, that is, of looking at the ideological and material connotations of the sugarmilling labour process as they manifested themselves in the sugar villages of South Africa. It is the principal concern of the study to demonstrate how the dynastic sugarmilling families, who are presented as a sugarocracy, impinged upon the culture of the sugarmill. By perceiving the culture of the sugarmill as evolving out of the sugarmilling labour process, a materialist interpretation of historical evidence is indicated as a method for analysing sugarocratic domination. This method is applied to empirical evidence derived primarily through literary research. A further methodological consideration is displayed in the emphasis given to causal relationships between sugarocratic influences upon the labour process and workers' responses to that process. Because of the centrality accorded to the labour process points of reference are readily found in studies of sugarmilling in other milieux. Thus each chapter of the thesis is introduced with relevant material on sugarmilling in regions where it has generally been subjected to more social analysis than has been the South African case. Arranged in three parts, the analysis begins with an account of the ascent of the sugarocracy since the turn of the twentieth century, and of the establishment and development of sugarocratic ideology and politics. In the second part, attention is focused on the sugarmill, with chapters devoted to sugar technology and the technical division of labour, the racial division of labour, and work-place control, respectively. The final part is given to an examination of life in the sugar village, and to the question of how, by means of accommodation and resistance, workers coped with the conditions under which they worked and lived. DA - 1985 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1985 T1 - The culture of the South African sugarmill : the impress of the sugarocracy TI - The culture of the South African sugarmill : the impress of the sugarocracy UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16995 ER - en_ZA


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