Quantifying the energy needs of the transport sector for South Africa: a bottom-up model

 

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dc.contributor.author Merven, Bruno
dc.contributor.author Stone, Adrian
dc.contributor.author Hughes, Alison
dc.contributor.author Cohen, Brett
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-08T13:16:55Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-08T13:16:55Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.citation Merven, B., Stone, A., Hughes, A., & Cohen, B. (2012). Quantifying the energy needs of the transport sector for South Africa: A bottom-up model. University of Cape Town, Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16905
dc.description.abstract Transport is a large consumer of energy in South Africa and vital for economic development. Currently the transport sector consumes 28% of final energy, the bulk of which, 97%, is in the form of liquid fuels. As the population grows and becomes wealthier, so the demand for passenger transport and private vehicles increases; similarly, rising GDP drives the demand for freight transport. Supply interruptions are costly to the economy and careful long‐term planning is required to ensure that there is sufficient infrastructure to support the efficient functioning and growth of the transport sector in the future. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Energy Research Centre, University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source Energy Research Centre en_ZA
dc.subject.other Energy consumption
dc.subject.other Transportation
dc.title Quantifying the energy needs of the transport sector for South Africa: a bottom-up model en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-02-03T12:34:48Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords energy needs en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords transport sector en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords south africa en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Energy Research Centre en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Merven, B., Stone, A., Hughes, A., & Cohen, B. (2012). Quantifying the energy needs of the transport sector for South Africa: a bottom-up model. <i>Energy Research Centre</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16905 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Merven, Bruno, Adrian Stone, Alison Hughes, and Brett Cohen "Quantifying the energy needs of the transport sector for South Africa: a bottom-up model." <i>Energy Research Centre</i> (2012) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16905 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Merven B, Stone A, Hughes A, Cohen B. Quantifying the energy needs of the transport sector for South Africa: a bottom-up model. Energy Research Centre. 2012; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16905. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Merven, Bruno AU - Stone, Adrian AU - Hughes, Alison AU - Cohen, Brett AB - Transport is a large consumer of energy in South Africa and vital for economic development. Currently the transport sector consumes 28% of final energy, the bulk of which, 97%, is in the form of liquid fuels. As the population grows and becomes wealthier, so the demand for passenger transport and private vehicles increases; similarly, rising GDP drives the demand for freight transport. Supply interruptions are costly to the economy and careful long‐term planning is required to ensure that there is sufficient infrastructure to support the efficient functioning and growth of the transport sector in the future. DA - 2012 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Energy Research Centre LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 T1 - Quantifying the energy needs of the transport sector for South Africa: a bottom-up model TI - Quantifying the energy needs of the transport sector for South Africa: a bottom-up model UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16905 ER - en_ZA


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)