Energy policies for sustainable development in South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Winkler, Harald
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-05T10:50:16Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-05T10:50:16Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.citation Winkler, H. (2007) Energy policies for sustainable development in South Africa. Energy for Sustainable Development 11(1):26-34. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0973-0826 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16807
dc.description.abstract This paper summarises the results of a study that analysed ways of making South Africa’s future energy development more sustainable. The South African economy is comparatively energy-intensive, with total primary energy supply of 11.7 MJ per US$ of GDP on a purchasing power parity basis, compared to 7.9 MJ/$ for Asia and 6.7 MJ/$ for Latin America. Moreover, the high dependence on coal makes the country also very carbon-intensive, with energy related CO2 emissions of 6.7 tonnes per capita, comparable to the OECD average of about 11 tCO2 /cap., and far higher than the non-OECD average of 1.7 tCO2/cap. Important policy initiatives are already under way to improve energy efficiency as well as the share of renewable energy. The impact of different energy policies, including alternative technologies for both supply and demand up to 2025, were analysed using the Markal model, a least-cost optimising tool. The reference case is close to the government’s Integrated Energy Plan, with CO2 emissions increasing from 337 million tonnes (Mt) in 2001 to 591 Mt in 2025. A cost-effective renewable energy policy scenario would increase the renewable electricity generation from 2,000 GWh in 2001 to almost 18,000 GWh in 2025, with significant contribution from solar thermal and biomass cogeneration technologies. Energy efficiency can make a substantial contribution, especially in industry. The combination of measures would reduce total energy system costs by 16 billion rands ($ 2.2 billion) and CO2 emissions by 770 Mt, each over a 25-year period. The policies analysed here can therefore contribute both to sustainable development and to climate change mitigation. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Elsevier en_ZA
dc.source Energy for Sustainable Development en_ZA
dc.subject.other Sustainable development
dc.subject.other Energy policy
dc.subject.other Greenhouse gas mitigation
dc.subject.other Climatic changes
dc.title Energy policies for sustainable development in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-02-03T08:22:59Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords Energy policies en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords sustainable development en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords South Africa en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Energy Research Centre en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Winkler, H. (2007). Energy policies for sustainable development in South Africa. <i>Energy for Sustainable Development</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16807 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Winkler, Harald "Energy policies for sustainable development in South Africa." <i>Energy for Sustainable Development</i> (2007) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16807 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Winkler H. Energy policies for sustainable development in South Africa. Energy for Sustainable Development. 2007; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16807. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Winkler, Harald AB - This paper summarises the results of a study that analysed ways of making South Africa’s future energy development more sustainable. The South African economy is comparatively energy-intensive, with total primary energy supply of 11.7 MJ per US$ of GDP on a purchasing power parity basis, compared to 7.9 MJ/$ for Asia and 6.7 MJ/$ for Latin America. Moreover, the high dependence on coal makes the country also very carbon-intensive, with energy related CO2 emissions of 6.7 tonnes per capita, comparable to the OECD average of about 11 tCO2 /cap., and far higher than the non-OECD average of 1.7 tCO2/cap. Important policy initiatives are already under way to improve energy efficiency as well as the share of renewable energy. The impact of different energy policies, including alternative technologies for both supply and demand up to 2025, were analysed using the Markal model, a least-cost optimising tool. The reference case is close to the government’s Integrated Energy Plan, with CO2 emissions increasing from 337 million tonnes (Mt) in 2001 to 591 Mt in 2025. A cost-effective renewable energy policy scenario would increase the renewable electricity generation from 2,000 GWh in 2001 to almost 18,000 GWh in 2025, with significant contribution from solar thermal and biomass cogeneration technologies. Energy efficiency can make a substantial contribution, especially in industry. The combination of measures would reduce total energy system costs by 16 billion rands ($ 2.2 billion) and CO2 emissions by 770 Mt, each over a 25-year period. The policies analysed here can therefore contribute both to sustainable development and to climate change mitigation. DA - 2007 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Energy for Sustainable Development LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2007 SM - 0973-0826 T1 - Energy policies for sustainable development in South Africa TI - Energy policies for sustainable development in South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16807 ER - en_ZA


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