Electricity from solar home systems in South Africa

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Prasad, Gisela
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-05T08:36:49Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-05T08:36:49Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.citation Prasad, G. (2007) Electricity from solar home systems in South Africa Create Acceptance project - South Africa: Case Study 2. Cape Town, Energy Research Centre. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16802
dc.description.abstract In developed countries, renewable energy (RE) technologies are most often introduced for environmental reasons, to reduce GHG emissions mandated under the Kyoto Protocol – which South Africa signed in 2002. The Protocol does not commit non-Annex 1 (developing) countries such as South Africa to any emission targets in the first commitment period (2008 to 2012), however, and it creates no external pressure to reduce emissions. So it is understandable that in this case study the major government concern is not the environment, but access to electricity for the poor in remote rural areas. RE technologies are not widely disseminated in South Africa, although solar resources are very high and solar technologies are particularly suitable. The general environmental awareness is limited when compared to European countries and it is only recently that the media have been more regularly covering issues such as global warming and its impact on South Africa. The South African government generally supports RE, and its RE policy stipulates a voluntary target of 10 000 GWh to be supplied from renewable sources by 2013. The target is approximately 10% of the country’s electricity demand, of which now less than 1% is met from renewable sources (DME 2004). Different players in projects and the industry give various explanations and reasons why the market has not responded more positively, often citing high initial capital cost as the major explanation. The two South African case studies describe solar water heaters (SWHs) (case study 1) and, in this report, electricity from solar home systems (case study 2). Both case studies include the impact of poverty on the dissemination and acceptance of the technology. SHS using photovoltaic panels to generate electricity have been provided as part of the National Electrification programme in remote poor rural areas to which the grid has not been extended, as a substitute for grid electricity, although in fact subsidised SHS were expected to bring light and television services at a much faster rate than they actually did. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Energy Research Centre, University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.source http://www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Prasad%20Electricity%20from%20SHSsl.pdf en_ZA
dc.subject.other Kyoto protocol
dc.subject.other Solar energy
dc.subject.other Climatic changes
dc.subject.other Greenhouse gas mitigation
dc.title Electricity from solar home systems in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2016-02-03T08:19:12Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords Solar electrification en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords home systems en_ZA
uct.subject.keywords south africa en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Energy Research Centre en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Prasad, G. (2007). Electricity from solar home systems in South Africa. <i>http://www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Prasad%20Electricity%20from%20SHSsl.pdf</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16802 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Prasad, Gisela "Electricity from solar home systems in South Africa." <i>http://www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Prasad%20Electricity%20from%20SHSsl.pdf</i> (2007) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16802 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Prasad G. Electricity from solar home systems in South Africa. http://www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Prasad%20Electricity%20from%20SHSsl.pdf. 2007; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16802. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Prasad, Gisela AB - In developed countries, renewable energy (RE) technologies are most often introduced for environmental reasons, to reduce GHG emissions mandated under the Kyoto Protocol – which South Africa signed in 2002. The Protocol does not commit non-Annex 1 (developing) countries such as South Africa to any emission targets in the first commitment period (2008 to 2012), however, and it creates no external pressure to reduce emissions. So it is understandable that in this case study the major government concern is not the environment, but access to electricity for the poor in remote rural areas. RE technologies are not widely disseminated in South Africa, although solar resources are very high and solar technologies are particularly suitable. The general environmental awareness is limited when compared to European countries and it is only recently that the media have been more regularly covering issues such as global warming and its impact on South Africa. The South African government generally supports RE, and its RE policy stipulates a voluntary target of 10 000 GWh to be supplied from renewable sources by 2013. The target is approximately 10% of the country’s electricity demand, of which now less than 1% is met from renewable sources (DME 2004). Different players in projects and the industry give various explanations and reasons why the market has not responded more positively, often citing high initial capital cost as the major explanation. The two South African case studies describe solar water heaters (SWHs) (case study 1) and, in this report, electricity from solar home systems (case study 2). Both case studies include the impact of poverty on the dissemination and acceptance of the technology. SHS using photovoltaic panels to generate electricity have been provided as part of the National Electrification programme in remote poor rural areas to which the grid has not been extended, as a substitute for grid electricity, although in fact subsidised SHS were expected to bring light and television services at a much faster rate than they actually did. DA - 2007 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town J1 - http://www.erc.uct.ac.za/Research/publications/07Prasad%20Electricity%20from%20SHSsl.pdf LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2007 T1 - Electricity from solar home systems in South Africa TI - Electricity from solar home systems in South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16802 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record