Meditation and nocturnal dreams in the psychology of C. G. Jung : an experimental investigation

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Saayman, Graham en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Faber, Phillip Anthony en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-05T07:11:09Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-05T07:11:09Z
dc.date.issued 1977 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Faber, P. 1977. Meditation and nocturnal dreams in the psychology of C. G. Jung : an experimental investigation. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16768
dc.description.abstract Meditational practices and sleep states have been viewed as related in the traditional doctrines of Yoga. Recent research on the physiological correlates of meditation has tended to confirm this relationship, although some controversy has arisen. Moreover, C.G. Jung postulated a relationship between the therapeutic technique of Active Imagination, which he described as a form of meditation, and dreaming. In the present investigation, the laboratory and home dreams of seven experienced practitioners of Yogic meditation are compared to those of a group of seven matched control subjects on measures of dream recall, amount of dream material and archetypal (transpersonal) content of dreams. In addition, the two groups are compared on measures of manifest sexuality, physical and verbal aggression, hedonic tone and active participation in dreams. The dreams of the meditators contained significantly more archetypal elements, reflecting universal, moral themes than did those of the non-meditators, which were characterised by a predominance of personal, everyday issues. Furthermore, there was a significantly higher recall rate and amount of content in the laboratory dreams of meditators. Archetypal dreams were reported at greater length than non-archetypal dreams. The dreams of the meditators contained significantly less manifest sexuality and significantly more active participation than those of the control group. No significant differences emerged between the two groups on the measures of physical and verbal aggression, and hedonic tone in dreams. The findings are discussed with reference to the possible differential effects of the practice of Active Imagination and Yogic meditation upon dream content. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Psychology en_ZA
dc.title Meditation and nocturnal dreams in the psychology of C. G. Jung : an experimental investigation en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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