Revealing complexities within flat-water kayaking: injury prevention and biomechanical analysis

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Tucker, Ross en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Karpul, David en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Noakes, Timothy en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Fisher, Julia Marguerite en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-25T11:43:31Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-25T11:43:31Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Fisher, J. 2015. Revealing complexities within flat-water kayaking: injury prevention and biomechanical analysis. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16522
dc.description Includes bibliographical references en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Elite kayakers are required to perform repetitive movements that create strength and flexibility asymmetries in their bodies, making them susceptible to injury. The first portion of this thesis is dedicated to investigating whether a supervised, corrective pre-habilitation programme of the kinetic chain, conducted twice a week for 10 weeks, would reduce these predisposing factors. A group of 19 marathon paddlers were assessed before and after the intervention, with nine of them receiving the intervention. The 10-week intervention programme was found to significantly improve scapular position and kinesis, thoracic spine extension and single arm pulling ability, thus suggesting improved shoulder function and reduced risk of injury. The second portion of the thesis involved novel biomechanical analysis of kayaking on the water and on a kayaking-ergometer. It is the first objective description of the three dimensional movements of the kayak in the literature. Sprint and marathon paddlers performed a 180 metre time trial using an instrumented paddle with an accelerometer and gyroscope attached to the boat for analysis of boat movement characteristics and paddler-generated forces. Similar patterns for paddle torque, boat acceleration and pitch were observed between male sprint paddlers and male marathon paddlers. However, the direction and timing of the roll and the yaw of the boat during the water phase of the kayak stroke differed between these groups of paddlers. In addition, substantial individual variation existed within the group of male marathon paddlers. On the kayaking ergometer, activation patterns of the trunk and pelvic muscles were measured using electromyography during a maximal 200 metre time trial. Gluteus medius, lower trapezius and erector spinae were measured for the first time in maximal kayaking. The latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major and external oblique muscles were more active during the contralateral phase than has previously been reported. When these paddlers performed a single arm pull test on the same day, the muscle activation patterns changed, and muscle groups were active according to their anatomical function and what has previously been described. First, variation of movement, flexibility and segmental training of the kinetic chain may be advantageous when incorporated with kayaking training to prevent shoulder injury risk factors in paddlers. Second, individual evaluation of three-dimensional boat kinematics and muscle recruitment timing provides objective insight into an individual's kayak technique, with potential benefits for improving technical performance and mechanical efficiency. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Exercise and Sports Science en_ZA
dc.title Revealing complexities within flat-water kayaking: injury prevention and biomechanical analysis en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department MRC/UCT RU for Exercise and Sport Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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