Legal issues in the contextual diffusion of independent regulatory agencies in Nigeria

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Corder, Hugh en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Andzenge, Terhemen en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-21T13:00:34Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-21T13:00:34Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Andzenge, T. 2015. Legal issues in the contextual diffusion of independent regulatory agencies in Nigeria. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16493
dc.description Includes bibliographical references en_ZA
dc.description.abstract In the last three decades, there has been a phenomenon, akin to a revolution sweeping through the world, leaving in its wake major consequences of economic, political, legal and constitutional dimensions. The role of the state as we know it has been reconstructed beyond recognition. From an all-encompassing monolith that owns, manages, and provides various infrastructures, goods and services directly to the public and also serves as a regulator, it has now been reduced to a mere bystander or an enabler. Its footprints in the sands of economic and political times have diminished. In its place has arisen the regulatory state, characterised by a thinning out of the state; and the emergence of an institutional innovation: the Independent Regulatory Agency. Its rise, growth and diffusion across jurisdictions and sectors, and most recently in developing countries including Nigeria have been unprecedented. This thesis centres on the question whether the Independent Regulatory Agency can function in Nigeria in a manner analogous to its counterparts in the developed economies and be able to ensure the provision of safe, affordable and efficient infrastructures and services. The thesis finds institutional fragility, limited capacity, information asymmetry, corruption and insecurity within critical political, economic and supporting institutions that ideally gives life and legitimacy to the IRA; while essential democratic concepts are adhered to more in the breach. These challenges present a difficult climate in which the Independent Regulatory Agency can thrive. As an alternative, the thesis advocates the adoption of two transitory regulatory models: regulatory contracts and contracting out or outsourcing of functions. Their utilisation would achieve the desired regulatory outcomes until maturity is attained in the political economy of Nigeria, while simultaneously mitigating its contextual limitations. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Regulatory agencies en_ZA
dc.subject.other Nigeria en_ZA
dc.title Legal issues in the contextual diffusion of independent regulatory agencies in Nigeria en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Law en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Public Law en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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