Molecular mechanisms of recombination restriction in the envelope gene of the human immunodeficiency virus

 

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dc.contributor.author Simon-Loriere, Etienne en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Galetto, Roman en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Hamoudi, Meriem en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Archer, John en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Lefeuvre, Pierre en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Martin, Darren P en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Robertson, David L en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Negroni, Matteo en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-02T05:05:44Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-02T05:05:44Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Simon-Loriere, E., Galetto, R., Hamoudi, M., Archer, J., Lefeuvre, P., Martin, D. P., ... & Negroni, M. (2009). Molecular mechanisms of recombination restriction in the envelope gene of the human immunodeficiency virus. PLoS Pathog, 5(5), e1000418. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1000418 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16157
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000418
dc.description.abstract Author Summary Recombination allows mixing portions of genomes of different origins, generating chimeric genes and genomes. With respect to the random generation of new mutations, it can lead to the simultaneous insertion of several substitutions, introducing more drastic changes in the genome. Furthermore, recombination is expected to yield a higher proportion of functional products since it combines variants that already exist in the population and that are therefore compatible with the survival of the organism. However, when recombination involves genetically distant strains, it can be constrained by the necessity to retain the functionality of the resulting products. In pathogens, which are subjected to strong selective pressures, recombination is particularly important, and several viruses, such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), readily recombine. Here, we demonstrate the existence of preferential regions for recombination in the HIV-1 envelope gene when crossing sequences representative of strains observed to recombine in vivo. Furthermore, some recombinants give a decreased proportion of functional products. When considering these factors, one can retrace the history of most natural HIV recombinants. Recombination in HIV appears not so unpredictable, therefore, and the existence of recombinants that frequently generate nonfunctional products highlights previously unappreciated limits of the genetic flexibility of HIV. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_ZA
dc.rights This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en_ZA
dc.source PLoS One en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens en_ZA
dc.subject.other Recombinant proteins en_ZA
dc.subject.other HIV en_ZA
dc.subject.other DNA recombination en_ZA
dc.subject.other HIV-1 en_ZA
dc.subject.other Sequence analysis en_ZA
dc.subject.other DNA sequence analysis en_ZA
dc.subject.other Evolutionary genetics en_ZA
dc.subject.other Viral evolution en_ZA
dc.title Molecular mechanisms of recombination restriction in the envelope gene of the human immunodeficiency virus en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder © 2009 Simon-Loriere et al en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.