Pondoks, houses, and hostels : a history of Nyanga 1946-1970, with a special focus on housing

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bradford, Helen en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Fast, Hildegarde Helene en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-02T04:43:44Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-02T04:43:44Z
dc.date.issued 1996 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Fast, H. 1996. Pondoks, houses, and hostels : a history of Nyanga 1946-1970, with a special focus on housing. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/16123
dc.description Bibliography: pages 344-361. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract In this thesis I outline the history of Nyanga up to 1970. Diverse aspects are covered, including location politics, women's protests, rent arrears and boycotts, and gangsterism. There is a special focus on housing issues, for they were related to most facets of location life and demonstrated the contradictions within apartheid policy. Four themes are followed throughout the thesis. First, the extent to which the state achieved control of the African urban population is assessed, particularly in terms of its housing and influx control policies. I argue that the formulation and implementation of policies were influenced minimally by pressures "from below", and that central and local authorities achieved extensive control over the lives of urban Africans. Nevertheless, government officials did not succeed in curbing African urbanisation or controlling the residential movement of urban Africans, as witnessed by the high number of "illegal" Africans and consistently high tenancy turnover. A second topic that threads its way through the thesis is the role of African constables and clerks in Nyanga. I show that residents working with the location administration were attracted particularly to the material benefits of collaboration. Utilising their linguistic skills and knowledge of location inhabitants, they extracted money and sexual favours from Nyanga residents and were given first priority in the allocation of Old Location houses. They did not, however, form an identifiable social group as they came from diverse occupational and educational backgrounds and did not associate closely with one another. A third theme is the differential impact of apartheid laws on African women. I outline the laws that applied to urban African women and describe the actual process by which they were expelled from the Cape Peninsula. Arising from this, the changing nature and scope of women's demonstrations in Nyanga is described. My research shows that the protests of the early 1950s, which were small, infrequent, and centred on local issues, broadened in the late 1950s to include the application of pass laws to African women. The reasons for the change are shown to be both political and material in nature, with their origin in the forced removals from Peninsula shack settlements. Fourthly, I have concentrated on spatial dynamics at various points. There were significant differences in physical space between Mau-Mau and the Old Location, which contributed to the social distance between the two neighbourhoods. During the massive "black spot" clearance campaign of the 1950s, the authorities succeeded in gaining spatial control over Africans by forcing them into segregated, fenced locations where entry and exit was monitored. To counteract this, residents asserted their control over the transit camp by constructing shacks in such a way as to impede raiding pass officials and make administrative surveillance of their lives difficult. The contradictory effects of placing contract workers in accommodation next to families are also examined: on the one hand, there was considerable socialising and cooperation between the two groups; on the other, much friction developed over the relationships between women in the married quarters and men in the hostels. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Blacks - Cape Town en_ZA
dc.subject.other Apartheid - Cape Town en_ZA
dc.subject.other Housing - Nyanga en_ZA
dc.subject.other Women, Black - South Africa en_ZA
dc.subject.other Blacks - Housing - South Africa en_ZA
dc.subject.other Influx control - South Africa en_ZA
dc.title Pondoks, houses, and hostels : a history of Nyanga 1946-1970, with a special focus on housing en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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