Nietzsche's comparative religion : an analysis of The Anti-Christ

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Chidester, David en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Wilson, Gary en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-28T06:08:52Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-28T06:08:52Z
dc.date.issued 1994 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Wilson, G. 1994. Nietzsche's comparative religion : an analysis of The Anti-Christ. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15986
dc.description Bibliography: pages 71-74. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This thesis explores the argument that Nietzsche's aim in his book The Anti-Christ is to reveal what he regards as the truth about Christianity, and that he uses detailed comparisons to prove this. Many forms of comparison are used by Nietzsche in The Anti-Christ. One is the comparison between Christianity and other religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam. Another is the comparison between different forms or even levels of Christianity. And yet another is the comparison between Christianity, science, and Buddhism, based on their degree of contact with reality. As these comparisons are traced in this thesis, a number of contradictions are encountered, and it would appear that these are due to Nietzsche's attempt to address two groups of readers - Christian readers, and those readers who are prepared for Nietzsche's radical philosophy. The contradictions arise when Nietzsche tries to please both groups of readers, to be both blunt and sophisticated at the same time. Nonetheless the tension created in attempting to address both these groups makes The Anti- Christ compelling reading, an effect Nietzsche hoped he would achieve. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Religious Studies en_ZA
dc.title Nietzsche's comparative religion : an analysis of The Anti-Christ en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Religious Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Wilson, G. (1994). <i>Nietzsche's comparative religion : an analysis of The Anti-Christ</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15986 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Wilson, Gary. <i>"Nietzsche's comparative religion : an analysis of The Anti-Christ."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies, 1994. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15986 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Wilson G. Nietzsche's comparative religion : an analysis of The Anti-Christ. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies, 1994 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15986 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Wilson, Gary AB - This thesis explores the argument that Nietzsche's aim in his book The Anti-Christ is to reveal what he regards as the truth about Christianity, and that he uses detailed comparisons to prove this. Many forms of comparison are used by Nietzsche in The Anti-Christ. One is the comparison between Christianity and other religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, and Islam. Another is the comparison between different forms or even levels of Christianity. And yet another is the comparison between Christianity, science, and Buddhism, based on their degree of contact with reality. As these comparisons are traced in this thesis, a number of contradictions are encountered, and it would appear that these are due to Nietzsche's attempt to address two groups of readers - Christian readers, and those readers who are prepared for Nietzsche's radical philosophy. The contradictions arise when Nietzsche tries to please both groups of readers, to be both blunt and sophisticated at the same time. Nonetheless the tension created in attempting to address both these groups makes The Anti- Christ compelling reading, an effect Nietzsche hoped he would achieve. DA - 1994 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1994 T1 - Nietzsche's comparative religion : an analysis of The Anti-Christ TI - Nietzsche's comparative religion : an analysis of The Anti-Christ UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15986 ER - en_ZA


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