Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey

 

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dc.contributor.author Tremblay, Yann en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Thiebault, Andréa en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mullers, Ralf en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Pistorius, Pierre en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-20T16:06:05Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-20T16:06:05Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Tremblay, Y., Thiebault, A., Mullers, R., & Pistorius, P. (2014). Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey. PloS one, 9(2). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0088424 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15925
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0088424
dc.description.abstract The study of ecological and behavioral processes has been revolutionized in the last two decades with the rapid development of biologging-science. Recently, using image-capturing devices, some pilot studies demonstrated the potential of understanding marine vertebrate movement patterns in relation to their proximate, as opposed to remote sensed environmental contexts. Here, using miniaturized video cameras and GPS tracking recorders simultaneously, we show for the first time that information on the immediate visual surroundings of a foraging seabird, the Cape gannet, is fundamental in understanding the origins of its movement patterns. We found that movement patterns were related to specific stimuli which were mostly other predators such as gannets, dolphins or fishing boats. Contrary to a widely accepted idea, our data suggest that foraging seabirds are not directly looking for prey. Instead, they search for indicators of the presence of prey, the latter being targeted at the very last moment and at a very small scale. We demonstrate that movement patterns of foraging seabirds can be heavily driven by processes unobservable with conventional methodology. Except perhaps for large scale processes, local-enhancement seems to be the only ruling mechanism; this has profounds implications for ecosystem-based management of marine areas. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_ZA
dc.rights This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en_ZA
dc.source PLoS One en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://journals.plos.org/plosone en_ZA
dc.subject.other Birds en_ZA
dc.subject.other Foraging en_ZA
dc.subject.other Boats en_ZA
dc.subject.other Dolphins en_ZA
dc.subject.other Predation en_ZA
dc.subject.other Seabirds en_ZA
dc.subject.other Bird flight en_ZA
dc.subject.other Marine ecology en_ZA
dc.title Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder © 2014 Tremblay et al en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Tremblay, Y., Thiebault, A., Mullers, R., & Pistorius, P. (2014). Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey. <i>PLoS One</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15925 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Tremblay, Yann, Andréa Thiebault, Ralf Mullers, and Pierre Pistorius "Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey." <i>PLoS One</i> (2014) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15925 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Tremblay Y, Thiebault A, Mullers R, Pistorius P. Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey. PLoS One. 2014; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15925. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Tremblay, Yann AU - Thiebault, Andréa AU - Mullers, Ralf AU - Pistorius, Pierre AB - The study of ecological and behavioral processes has been revolutionized in the last two decades with the rapid development of biologging-science. Recently, using image-capturing devices, some pilot studies demonstrated the potential of understanding marine vertebrate movement patterns in relation to their proximate, as opposed to remote sensed environmental contexts. Here, using miniaturized video cameras and GPS tracking recorders simultaneously, we show for the first time that information on the immediate visual surroundings of a foraging seabird, the Cape gannet, is fundamental in understanding the origins of its movement patterns. We found that movement patterns were related to specific stimuli which were mostly other predators such as gannets, dolphins or fishing boats. Contrary to a widely accepted idea, our data suggest that foraging seabirds are not directly looking for prey. Instead, they search for indicators of the presence of prey, the latter being targeted at the very last moment and at a very small scale. We demonstrate that movement patterns of foraging seabirds can be heavily driven by processes unobservable with conventional methodology. Except perhaps for large scale processes, local-enhancement seems to be the only ruling mechanism; this has profounds implications for ecosystem-based management of marine areas. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0088424 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - PLoS One LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey TI - Bird-borne video-cameras show that seabird movement patterns relate to previously unrevealed proximate environment, not prey UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15925 ER - en_ZA


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.