HIV prevalence by race co-varies closely with concurrency and number of sex partners in South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Kenyon, Chris en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Buyze, Jozefien en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Colebunders, Robert en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-20T16:05:11Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-20T16:05:11Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Kenyon, C., Buyze, J., & Colebunders, R. (2012). HIV prevalence by race co-varies closely with concurrency and number of sex partners in South Africa. PloS one, 8(5), e64080. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064080 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15915
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0064080
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: HIV prevalence differs by more than an order of magnitude between South Africa's racial groups. Comparing the sexual behaviors and other risk factors for HIV transmission between the different races may shed light on the determinants of South Africa's generalized HIV epidemic. METHODS: Five nationally representative and one city-representative population-based surveys of sexual behavior were used to assess the extent to which various risk factors co-varied with HIV prevalence by race in South Africa. RESULTS: In 2004, the prevalence of HIV was 0.5%, 1%, 3.2% and 19.9% in 15-49 year old whites, Indians, coloureds and blacks respectively. The risk factors which co-varied with HIV prevalence by race in the six surveys were age of sexual debut (in five out of five surveys for men and three out of six surveys for women), age gap (zero surveys in men and three in women), mean number of sex partners in the previous year (five surveys in men and three in women) and concurrent partnerships (five surveys in men and one in women). Condom usage and circumcision were both more prevalent in the high HIV prevalence groups. The reported prevalence of concurrency was 6 to 17 times higher in the black as opposed to the white men in the five surveys. CONCLUSIONS: The differences in sexual behavior in general, and the prevalence of concurrency and the number of sexual partners in particular, offer a plausible and parsimonious cause to explain a part of the differing prevalences of HIV between South Africa's racial groups. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_ZA
dc.rights This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en_ZA
dc.source PLoS One en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://journals.plos.org/plosone en_ZA
dc.subject.other HIV en_ZA
dc.subject.other HIV epidemiology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Surveys en_ZA
dc.subject.other South Africa en_ZA
dc.subject.other Circumcision en_ZA
dc.subject.other Human sexual behavior en_ZA
dc.subject.other Demography en_ZA
dc.subject.other Ethnic epidemiology en_ZA
dc.title HIV prevalence by race co-varies closely with concurrency and number of sex partners in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder © 2013 Kenyon et al en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.