Towards a regional development strategy for Namaqualand

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Wilson, Francis en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Dunne, Janeen Mary en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-20T15:37:10Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-20T15:37:10Z
dc.date.issued 1986 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Dunne, J. 1986. Towards a regional development strategy for Namaqualand. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15857
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 269-279. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Initiated by the Second Carnegie Conference on Poverty in South Africa, this study analyses the causes and extent of underdevelopment and poverty in Namaqualand and outlines a possible approach to redress these problems. Namaqualand is shown to be a sparsely populated area, the physical characteristics of which are both a fundamental cause of underdevelopment and a constraint on future development. It is argued that competition for land and other resources is an important cause of poverty in the region. The processes by which the indigenous population was forced into uninhabitable areas, and mission stations were established to reserve land for local people, are traced. The contradictory role of missionaries is analysed as well as Government and other's efforts to coerce the region's inhabitants into wage labour. Relevant literature is reviewed to elucidate underdevelopment and the scope for future development. The conclusion drawn is that no body of theory adequately explains Namaqualand's underdevelopment or offers workable solutions. An eclectic approach is adopted. The present socio-economic characteristics of the population and the state of development in the major economic sectors are described. It is evident that there is little economic diversification. Namaqualand's inhabitants depend heavily on economic activities vulnerable to marked fluctuations. Employment opportunities are limited. Living standards are constrained by poor education, physical and social mobility. Current development projects and strategies are listed and analyzed. Initiatives taken by various development agents are found to have been retarded by the constraints already mentioned. It is concluded that they lack co-ordination and do not form part of a clearly formulated development strategy. A development proposal encompassing distinct strategies is presented. These are: (i) to enhance economic mobility (ii) to improve the quality of life (iii) to exploit development potential. The ways in which these strategies complement one another are outlined, and government's role emphasized. It is argued that efforts should be concentrated on activities in which Namaqualand appears to have a comparative advantage. The need for applied research into appropriate projects and techniques is stressed as is community involvement in all phases. Close co-operation between development agents is essential. Finally in an addendum some constraints and parallels between Namaqualand and some smaller black homelands in South Africa are drawn. Statutory influx control has not determined Namaqualand's low population mobility. Emigration is possible and should constitute a vital element of any development strategy for the region. The effect on the rest of South Africa would be negligible compared to the black homeland's surplus population. At the same time the need for local government initiatives and for the transfer of public resources into such regions is stressed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Economics en_ZA
dc.title Towards a regional development strategy for Namaqualand en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Economics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Dunne, J. M. (1986). <i>Towards a regional development strategy for Namaqualand</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15857 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Dunne, Janeen Mary. <i>"Towards a regional development strategy for Namaqualand."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics, 1986. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15857 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Dunne JM. Towards a regional development strategy for Namaqualand. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics, 1986 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15857 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Dunne, Janeen Mary AB - Initiated by the Second Carnegie Conference on Poverty in South Africa, this study analyses the causes and extent of underdevelopment and poverty in Namaqualand and outlines a possible approach to redress these problems. Namaqualand is shown to be a sparsely populated area, the physical characteristics of which are both a fundamental cause of underdevelopment and a constraint on future development. It is argued that competition for land and other resources is an important cause of poverty in the region. The processes by which the indigenous population was forced into uninhabitable areas, and mission stations were established to reserve land for local people, are traced. The contradictory role of missionaries is analysed as well as Government and other's efforts to coerce the region's inhabitants into wage labour. Relevant literature is reviewed to elucidate underdevelopment and the scope for future development. The conclusion drawn is that no body of theory adequately explains Namaqualand's underdevelopment or offers workable solutions. An eclectic approach is adopted. The present socio-economic characteristics of the population and the state of development in the major economic sectors are described. It is evident that there is little economic diversification. Namaqualand's inhabitants depend heavily on economic activities vulnerable to marked fluctuations. Employment opportunities are limited. Living standards are constrained by poor education, physical and social mobility. Current development projects and strategies are listed and analyzed. Initiatives taken by various development agents are found to have been retarded by the constraints already mentioned. It is concluded that they lack co-ordination and do not form part of a clearly formulated development strategy. A development proposal encompassing distinct strategies is presented. These are: (i) to enhance economic mobility (ii) to improve the quality of life (iii) to exploit development potential. The ways in which these strategies complement one another are outlined, and government's role emphasized. It is argued that efforts should be concentrated on activities in which Namaqualand appears to have a comparative advantage. The need for applied research into appropriate projects and techniques is stressed as is community involvement in all phases. Close co-operation between development agents is essential. Finally in an addendum some constraints and parallels between Namaqualand and some smaller black homelands in South Africa are drawn. Statutory influx control has not determined Namaqualand's low population mobility. Emigration is possible and should constitute a vital element of any development strategy for the region. The effect on the rest of South Africa would be negligible compared to the black homeland's surplus population. At the same time the need for local government initiatives and for the transfer of public resources into such regions is stressed. DA - 1986 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1986 T1 - Towards a regional development strategy for Namaqualand TI - Towards a regional development strategy for Namaqualand UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15857 ER - en_ZA


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