A theological critique of the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Villa-Vicencio, Charles en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Moll, Peter Graham en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-13T04:24:47Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-13T04:24:47Z
dc.date.issued 1984 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Moll, P. 1984. A theological critique of the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15803
dc.description Bibliography: pages 330-359. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The essence of this thesis is a critique of the structure and form of the military chaplaincy in South Africa in terms of theological presuppositions that can generally be associated with Karl Barth's understanding of ministry. It focuses on the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches of South Africa: the period selected is the past ten years. After surveying the rather scarce literature on the military chaplaincy in South Africa and several Western countries, the author briefly outlines those aspects of the theology of ministry of Karl Barth pertinent to this thesis. In addition, the author explains his own position on war and conscientious objection, which is generally speaking in keeping with what may be referred to as the Barthian perspective on ministry. The author then examines the South African Chaplains' Service. He finds several aspects incompatible with the theology of ministry outlined in Chapter 2: rank, uniform, military appointment of senior staff, command influence of the military over chaplains, the hierarchical structure of the Chaplains' Service, in-house training of chaplains, security clearance and secrecy. He argues that the real test of the freedom of the military chaplaincy is whether chaplains are free to convey the church's message of peace. The author concludes that the English-speaking churches cannot yet be assured of the freedom of their chaplains, and shows that the "complete freedom" to which most of the Permanent Force chaplains lay claim is illusory. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Theology - Christian Religion en_ZA
dc.subject.other Chaplains, Military en_ZA
dc.title A theological critique of the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Religious Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Moll, P. G. (1984). <i>A theological critique of the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15803 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Moll, Peter Graham. <i>"A theological critique of the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies, 1984. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15803 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Moll PG. A theological critique of the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies, 1984 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15803 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Moll, Peter Graham AB - The essence of this thesis is a critique of the structure and form of the military chaplaincy in South Africa in terms of theological presuppositions that can generally be associated with Karl Barth's understanding of ministry. It focuses on the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches of South Africa: the period selected is the past ten years. After surveying the rather scarce literature on the military chaplaincy in South Africa and several Western countries, the author briefly outlines those aspects of the theology of ministry of Karl Barth pertinent to this thesis. In addition, the author explains his own position on war and conscientious objection, which is generally speaking in keeping with what may be referred to as the Barthian perspective on ministry. The author then examines the South African Chaplains' Service. He finds several aspects incompatible with the theology of ministry outlined in Chapter 2: rank, uniform, military appointment of senior staff, command influence of the military over chaplains, the hierarchical structure of the Chaplains' Service, in-house training of chaplains, security clearance and secrecy. He argues that the real test of the freedom of the military chaplaincy is whether chaplains are free to convey the church's message of peace. The author concludes that the English-speaking churches cannot yet be assured of the freedom of their chaplains, and shows that the "complete freedom" to which most of the Permanent Force chaplains lay claim is illusory. DA - 1984 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1984 T1 - A theological critique of the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches TI - A theological critique of the military chaplaincy of the English-speaking churches UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15803 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record