The nature and impact of cyberbullying among South African youth : an explanatory analysis

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Van Belle, Jean-Paul en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Payne, Alister en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-08T11:43:45Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-08T11:43:45Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Payne, A. 2015. The nature and impact of cyberbullying among South African youth : an explanatory analysis. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15693
dc.description.abstract Cyberbullying, bullying via electronic media and communication, is on the increase. It has been thrust to the forefront of the public agenda, with concerns about the psychological and health impacts resulting from online victimisation. There is limited research on the phenomenon and the extent of the problem is unknown in South Africa. Furthermore, inconsistencies between the various definitions has added to our understanding of the problem, and factors influencing cyberbullying are not comprehensively known. This dissertation proposes an alternate definition which does not rely upon repetition as a major characteristic, and investigates the extent of which guardianship and self-control influence online behaviours. 3033 adolescent children aged 11 to 17 from seventeen South African schools responded to our survey examining the nature, extent and impacts of cyberbullying. Incidents of cyberbullying were examined in relation to gender, age and school grade, internet usage, traditional bullying factors, and economic factors. There was a significant incidence of cyberbullying including in primary schools (Grades 6 and 7), and among those pupils exhibiting traditional bullying victim and perpetrator attributes. In contradiction to current research, there were correlations to gender with girls reporting significantly more incidents of cyber victimisation. Cyberbullying impacts were perceived as negative, eliciting feels of anger, fear and depression. Where significant, the results from 2014 were compared to the 2012 results. The results also indicate that in online bullying, repetition was not a factor, and victims reported no less impact from a single incident compared to repetitive incidents. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Information Systems en_ZA
dc.title The nature and impact of cyberbullying among South African youth : an explanatory analysis en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Information Systems en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MCom en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Payne, A. (2015). <i>The nature and impact of cyberbullying among South African youth : an explanatory analysis</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Department of Information Systems. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15693 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Payne, Alister. <i>"The nature and impact of cyberbullying among South African youth : an explanatory analysis."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Department of Information Systems, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15693 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Payne A. The nature and impact of cyberbullying among South African youth : an explanatory analysis. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Department of Information Systems, 2015 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15693 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Payne, Alister AB - Cyberbullying, bullying via electronic media and communication, is on the increase. It has been thrust to the forefront of the public agenda, with concerns about the psychological and health impacts resulting from online victimisation. There is limited research on the phenomenon and the extent of the problem is unknown in South Africa. Furthermore, inconsistencies between the various definitions has added to our understanding of the problem, and factors influencing cyberbullying are not comprehensively known. This dissertation proposes an alternate definition which does not rely upon repetition as a major characteristic, and investigates the extent of which guardianship and self-control influence online behaviours. 3033 adolescent children aged 11 to 17 from seventeen South African schools responded to our survey examining the nature, extent and impacts of cyberbullying. Incidents of cyberbullying were examined in relation to gender, age and school grade, internet usage, traditional bullying factors, and economic factors. There was a significant incidence of cyberbullying including in primary schools (Grades 6 and 7), and among those pupils exhibiting traditional bullying victim and perpetrator attributes. In contradiction to current research, there were correlations to gender with girls reporting significantly more incidents of cyber victimisation. Cyberbullying impacts were perceived as negative, eliciting feels of anger, fear and depression. Where significant, the results from 2014 were compared to the 2012 results. The results also indicate that in online bullying, repetition was not a factor, and victims reported no less impact from a single incident compared to repetitive incidents. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - The nature and impact of cyberbullying among South African youth : an explanatory analysis TI - The nature and impact of cyberbullying among South African youth : an explanatory analysis UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15693 ER - en_ZA


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