New distinctions : the impact of class and race on the cultural preferences of youth in Cape Town and Belo Horizonte

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Seekings, Jeremy en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Schenk, Jan-Christof en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-08T11:40:45Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-08T11:40:45Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Schenk, J. 2015. New distinctions : the impact of class and race on the cultural preferences of youth in Cape Town and Belo Horizonte. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15684
dc.description.abstract Sociological treatments of the reproduction of social inequality in South Africa largely focus on its historical, political and economical aspects while references to popular culture are commonly used to describe differences, often in combination with racial discourse, rather than explain them. As a result much of South African cultural sociology, especially with regards to youth culture, is entailed in in-depth ethnographic descriptions of particular subcultures. Less common is scholarly work dealing with the role of taste and cultural preferences in the reconfiguration of common perceptions of 'otherness', both in class and race terms. This dissertation shifts the focus towards the structural aspects of popular culture and, particularly, youth culture. First, inspired by Bourdieu's work on distinction, it explores the segregating potential of contemporary youth culture in South Africa, especially where class and race con- notations meet. It then follows this thread of adapting Bourdieu's work to contemporary South African youth by identifying the media as a crucial factor alongside family and school for the preservation of racialised class characteristics. In a third step it takes the observations made in the South African context and compares them to youth culture in Brazil in order to establish the existence of common structures of difference that exist in different countries as a result of glocalization. The thesis established in this dissertation is that the cultural preferences of youth often come with class and race connotations. This interplay between class and race can be explained historic- ally as well as structurally through media consumption, which plays a significant role in the way young people learn to dress, speak, carry themselves and generally position themselves in relation to others. Due to global cultural flows these processes do not remain purely local phenomena but they find expression in localised forms as common structures of difference around the globe, thus structurally undermining local efforts to build a non-racial, non-classist society. These conclusions are based on primary research using a multi-method approach combining surveys on taste and racial attitudes with school-going youth in South Africa (Cape Town, n=1196) and Brazil (Belo Horizonte, n=860) with in-depth focus group interviews (only Cape Town). Using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis (survey data) combined with qualitative data analysis (interviews) it was possible to demonstrate that there are clear differences in the cultural and media preferences of South African youth along class and race lines, which are reflected, to a lesser extent, in the cultural and media preferences of Brazilian youth. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Sociology en_ZA
dc.title New distinctions : the impact of class and race on the cultural preferences of youth in Cape Town and Belo Horizonte en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Sociology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Schenk, J. (2015). <i>New distinctions : the impact of class and race on the cultural preferences of youth in Cape Town and Belo Horizonte</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15684 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Schenk, Jan-Christof. <i>"New distinctions : the impact of class and race on the cultural preferences of youth in Cape Town and Belo Horizonte."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15684 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Schenk J. New distinctions : the impact of class and race on the cultural preferences of youth in Cape Town and Belo Horizonte. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Sociology, 2015 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15684 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Schenk, Jan-Christof AB - Sociological treatments of the reproduction of social inequality in South Africa largely focus on its historical, political and economical aspects while references to popular culture are commonly used to describe differences, often in combination with racial discourse, rather than explain them. As a result much of South African cultural sociology, especially with regards to youth culture, is entailed in in-depth ethnographic descriptions of particular subcultures. Less common is scholarly work dealing with the role of taste and cultural preferences in the reconfiguration of common perceptions of 'otherness', both in class and race terms. This dissertation shifts the focus towards the structural aspects of popular culture and, particularly, youth culture. First, inspired by Bourdieu's work on distinction, it explores the segregating potential of contemporary youth culture in South Africa, especially where class and race con- notations meet. It then follows this thread of adapting Bourdieu's work to contemporary South African youth by identifying the media as a crucial factor alongside family and school for the preservation of racialised class characteristics. In a third step it takes the observations made in the South African context and compares them to youth culture in Brazil in order to establish the existence of common structures of difference that exist in different countries as a result of glocalization. The thesis established in this dissertation is that the cultural preferences of youth often come with class and race connotations. This interplay between class and race can be explained historic- ally as well as structurally through media consumption, which plays a significant role in the way young people learn to dress, speak, carry themselves and generally position themselves in relation to others. Due to global cultural flows these processes do not remain purely local phenomena but they find expression in localised forms as common structures of difference around the globe, thus structurally undermining local efforts to build a non-racial, non-classist society. These conclusions are based on primary research using a multi-method approach combining surveys on taste and racial attitudes with school-going youth in South Africa (Cape Town, n=1196) and Brazil (Belo Horizonte, n=860) with in-depth focus group interviews (only Cape Town). Using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis (survey data) combined with qualitative data analysis (interviews) it was possible to demonstrate that there are clear differences in the cultural and media preferences of South African youth along class and race lines, which are reflected, to a lesser extent, in the cultural and media preferences of Brazilian youth. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - New distinctions : the impact of class and race on the cultural preferences of youth in Cape Town and Belo Horizonte TI - New distinctions : the impact of class and race on the cultural preferences of youth in Cape Town and Belo Horizonte UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15684 ER - en_ZA


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