Histories of forced sex and health outcomes among Southern African lesbian and bisexual women: a cross-sectional study

 

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dc.contributor.author Sandfort, Theo en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Frazer, M en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Matebeni, Zethu en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Reddy, Vasu en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Southey-Swartz, Ian en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Southern African Lesbian and Bisexual Women Research Team en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-07T08:50:09Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-07T08:50:09Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Sandfort, T., Frazer, M. S., Matebeni, Z., Reddy, V., & Southey-Swartz, I. (2015). Histories of forced sex and health outcomes among Southern African lesbian and bisexual women: a cross-sectional study. BMC women's health, 15(1), 22. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15639
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12905-015-0181-6
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Experiences of forced sex have been shown to be prevalent in Southern Africa. Negative outcomes of forced sex have been documented in general populations of women and men and include alcohol abuse, drug use, mental health problems, mental distress, sexual health problems and poor overall health. This study is the first to examine experiences of forced sex and associated health problems among lesbian and bisexual women in Southern Africa. METHODS: This study is based on data collected as part of a collaborative endeavor involving various Southern African community-based organizations. Lesbian and bisexual women in four Southern African countries participated in a cross-sectional survey, for a total study sample of 591. RESULTS: Nearly one-third of participants had been forced to have sex at some time in their lives. Thirty-one percent of all women reported to have experienced forced sex at least once in their life: 14.9% reported forced sex by men only; 6.6% reported forced sex by women only; 9.6% had had forced sexual experiences with both men and women. Participants experienced forced sex by men as more serious than forced sex by women; forced sex by women was more likely to involve intimate partners compared to forced sex by men. Participants who experienced forced sex by men were more likely to report drug problems, mental distress and lower sense of belonging. Forced sex by women was associated with drinking problems and mental distress. Having experienced forced sex by both men and women was associated with lower sense of belonging to the LGBT community, drug use problem and mental distress. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that forced sex among Southern African women is a serious issue that needs further exploration. Clinicians should be made aware of the prevalence and possible consequences of forced sex among lesbian and bisexual women. Policies and community interventions should be designed to address this problem. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
dc.rights This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en_ZA
dc.source BMC Women's Health en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcwomenshealth/ en_ZA
dc.subject.other Lesbian and bisexual women en_ZA
dc.subject.other Forced sex en_ZA
dc.subject.other Mental health en_ZA
dc.subject.other Southern Africa en_ZA
dc.title Histories of forced sex and health outcomes among Southern African lesbian and bisexual women: a cross-sectional study en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder 2015 Sandfort et al.; licensee BioMed Central. en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Institute for Humanities in Africa en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Sandfort, T., Frazer, M., Matebeni, Z., Reddy, V., Southey-Swartz, I., & (2015). Histories of forced sex and health outcomes among Southern African lesbian and bisexual women: a cross-sectional study. <i>BMC Women's Health</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15639 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Sandfort, Theo, M Frazer, Zethu Matebeni, Vasu Reddy, Ian Southey-Swartz, and "Histories of forced sex and health outcomes among Southern African lesbian and bisexual women: a cross-sectional study." <i>BMC Women's Health</i> (2015) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15639 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Sandfort T, Frazer M, Matebeni Z, Reddy V, Southey-Swartz I, . Histories of forced sex and health outcomes among Southern African lesbian and bisexual women: a cross-sectional study. BMC Women's Health. 2015; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15639. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Sandfort, Theo AU - Frazer, M AU - Matebeni, Zethu AU - Reddy, Vasu AU - Southey-Swartz, Ian AU - Southern African Lesbian and Bisexual Women Research Team AB - BACKGROUND: Experiences of forced sex have been shown to be prevalent in Southern Africa. Negative outcomes of forced sex have been documented in general populations of women and men and include alcohol abuse, drug use, mental health problems, mental distress, sexual health problems and poor overall health. This study is the first to examine experiences of forced sex and associated health problems among lesbian and bisexual women in Southern Africa. METHODS: This study is based on data collected as part of a collaborative endeavor involving various Southern African community-based organizations. Lesbian and bisexual women in four Southern African countries participated in a cross-sectional survey, for a total study sample of 591. RESULTS: Nearly one-third of participants had been forced to have sex at some time in their lives. Thirty-one percent of all women reported to have experienced forced sex at least once in their life: 14.9% reported forced sex by men only; 6.6% reported forced sex by women only; 9.6% had had forced sexual experiences with both men and women. Participants experienced forced sex by men as more serious than forced sex by women; forced sex by women was more likely to involve intimate partners compared to forced sex by men. Participants who experienced forced sex by men were more likely to report drug problems, mental distress and lower sense of belonging. Forced sex by women was associated with drinking problems and mental distress. Having experienced forced sex by both men and women was associated with lower sense of belonging to the LGBT community, drug use problem and mental distress. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that forced sex among Southern African women is a serious issue that needs further exploration. Clinicians should be made aware of the prevalence and possible consequences of forced sex among lesbian and bisexual women. Policies and community interventions should be designed to address this problem. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s12905-015-0181-6 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Women's Health LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Histories of forced sex and health outcomes among Southern African lesbian and bisexual women: a cross-sectional study TI - Histories of forced sex and health outcomes among Southern African lesbian and bisexual women: a cross-sectional study UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15639 ER - en_ZA


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This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License