Property rights and the production of the urban built environment in Zambia

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Mooya, Manya en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Munshifwa, Ephraim Kabunda en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-04T17:59:09Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-04T17:59:09Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Munshifwa, E. 2015. Property rights and the production of the urban built environment in Zambia. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15572
dc.description.abstract This study investigated the phenomenon whereby settlements with ostensibly similar socio- economic status exhibited significantly different physical outcomes, such as in the quality of houses, spatial arrangements and available services. The study investigated three related questions. Firstly, given the similarity in the levels of incomes, what is the relationship between property rights and physical development outcomes in low income settlements? Secondly, what are the underlying mechanisms and processes by which these physical developments are produced? Thirdly, what is the relationship between formal and informal institutions and organisations in the production of the built environment? Corresponding to these questions were three hypotheses. The first hypothesis was that, at any given level of average incomes, different strengths of property rights have differential effects on physical development outcomes. The second hypothesis was that different property rights are associated with different mechanisms and processes in the physical development process and thirdly that situations of extra-legal property rights require State mechanisms in the production of the built environment. Using a theoretical, conceptual and analytical framework provided by the new institutional economics, the study employed the comparative institutional analysis methodology to determine the influence of three types of property rights on the production of the built environment in Zambia. These rights were categorised as informal, semi-legal and legalised, and are to be found respectively in Mindolo North, Chipata and Ipusukilo, three settlements in Kitwe selected as case studies. Empirical data was collected using household surveys, focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews and observations. The study finds that stronger property rights are associated with better quality physical development outcomes. Furthermore, the study finds that different types of property rights are associated with different mechanisms and processes for the production of the built environment. Finally, the study finds that where property rights are extra- illegal or informal, successful development requires that there be facilitative interaction between formal institutions of the State at one hand, and informal institutions and organisations at the other. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Construction Economics and Management en_ZA
dc.title Property rights and the production of the urban built environment in Zambia en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Construction Economics and Management en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Munshifwa, E. K. (2015). <i>Property rights and the production of the urban built environment in Zambia</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Construction Economics and Management. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15572 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Munshifwa, Ephraim Kabunda. <i>"Property rights and the production of the urban built environment in Zambia."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Construction Economics and Management, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15572 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Munshifwa EK. Property rights and the production of the urban built environment in Zambia. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Construction Economics and Management, 2015 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15572 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Munshifwa, Ephraim Kabunda AB - This study investigated the phenomenon whereby settlements with ostensibly similar socio- economic status exhibited significantly different physical outcomes, such as in the quality of houses, spatial arrangements and available services. The study investigated three related questions. Firstly, given the similarity in the levels of incomes, what is the relationship between property rights and physical development outcomes in low income settlements? Secondly, what are the underlying mechanisms and processes by which these physical developments are produced? Thirdly, what is the relationship between formal and informal institutions and organisations in the production of the built environment? Corresponding to these questions were three hypotheses. The first hypothesis was that, at any given level of average incomes, different strengths of property rights have differential effects on physical development outcomes. The second hypothesis was that different property rights are associated with different mechanisms and processes in the physical development process and thirdly that situations of extra-legal property rights require State mechanisms in the production of the built environment. Using a theoretical, conceptual and analytical framework provided by the new institutional economics, the study employed the comparative institutional analysis methodology to determine the influence of three types of property rights on the production of the built environment in Zambia. These rights were categorised as informal, semi-legal and legalised, and are to be found respectively in Mindolo North, Chipata and Ipusukilo, three settlements in Kitwe selected as case studies. Empirical data was collected using household surveys, focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews and observations. The study finds that stronger property rights are associated with better quality physical development outcomes. Furthermore, the study finds that different types of property rights are associated with different mechanisms and processes for the production of the built environment. Finally, the study finds that where property rights are extra- illegal or informal, successful development requires that there be facilitative interaction between formal institutions of the State at one hand, and informal institutions and organisations at the other. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Property rights and the production of the urban built environment in Zambia TI - Property rights and the production of the urban built environment in Zambia UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15572 ER - en_ZA


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