Nutritional supplement products: does the label information influence purchasing decisions for the physically active?

 

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dc.contributor.author Gabriels, Gary en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Lambert, Mike en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-23T12:08:39Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-23T12:08:39Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Gabriels, G., & Lambert, M. (2013). Nutritional supplement products: does the label information influence purchasing decisions for the physically active?. Nutrition journal, 12(1), 133. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15251
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2891-12-133
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: The increase in sales of nutritional supplement globally can be attributed, in part, to aggressive marketing by manufacturers, rather than because the nutritional supplements have become more effective. Furthermore, the accuracy of the labelling often goes unchallenged. Therefore, any effects of the supplement, may be due to contaminants or adulterants in these products not reflected on the label. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine how consumers of nutritional supplements acquired information to assist their decision-making processes, when purchasing a product. The study was approved by the University of Cape Town, Faculty of Health Sciences Human Research Ethics Committee. The questionnaire consisted of seven, closed and open-ended questions. The participants were asked to respond to the questions according to a defined list of statements. A total of 259 participants completed and returned questionnaires. The data and processing of the returned questionnaires was captured using Windows-based Microsoft(R) Office Excel 2003 SP 1 (Excel (c) 1985-2003 Microsoft Corporation). Statistica Version 10 (copyright (c) Stat Soft, Inc. 1984-2011) was used to calculate the descriptive statistics. RESULTS: The main finding of the study was that nearly 70% of the respondents who purchased supplements were strongly influenced by container label information that stipulated that the nutritional supplement product is free of banned substances. The second finding was that just over 50% of the respondents attached importance to the quality of the nutritional supplement product information on the container label. The third finding was that about 40% of the respondents were strongly influenced by the ingredients on the labels when they purchased nutritional supplements. CONCLUSION: This study, (i) identifies short-comings in current labelling information practices, (ii) provides opportunities to improve label and non-label information and communication, and, (iii) presents the case for quality assurance laboratory "screening testing" of declared and undeclared contaminants and/or adulterants, that could have negative consequences to the consumer. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
dc.rights This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_ZA
dc.source Nutrition Journal en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.nutritionj.com/ en_ZA
dc.subject.other Nutritional supplements en_ZA
dc.subject.other Information labels en_ZA
dc.subject.other Consumers en_ZA
dc.subject.other Olympics en_ZA
dc.subject.other Paralympics en_ZA
dc.subject.other Physical activity en_ZA
dc.subject.other Laboratory screen testing en_ZA
dc.title Nutritional supplement products: does the label information influence purchasing decisions for the physically active? en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder 2013 Gabriels and Lambert; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Clinical Pharmacology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Gabriels, G., & Lambert, M. (2013). Nutritional supplement products: does the label information influence purchasing decisions for the physically active?. <i>Nutrition Journal</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15251 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Gabriels, Gary, and Mike Lambert "Nutritional supplement products: does the label information influence purchasing decisions for the physically active?." <i>Nutrition Journal</i> (2013) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15251 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Gabriels G, Lambert M. Nutritional supplement products: does the label information influence purchasing decisions for the physically active?. Nutrition Journal. 2013; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15251. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Gabriels, Gary AU - Lambert, Mike AB - BACKGROUND: The increase in sales of nutritional supplement globally can be attributed, in part, to aggressive marketing by manufacturers, rather than because the nutritional supplements have become more effective. Furthermore, the accuracy of the labelling often goes unchallenged. Therefore, any effects of the supplement, may be due to contaminants or adulterants in these products not reflected on the label. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine how consumers of nutritional supplements acquired information to assist their decision-making processes, when purchasing a product. The study was approved by the University of Cape Town, Faculty of Health Sciences Human Research Ethics Committee. The questionnaire consisted of seven, closed and open-ended questions. The participants were asked to respond to the questions according to a defined list of statements. A total of 259 participants completed and returned questionnaires. The data and processing of the returned questionnaires was captured using Windows-based Microsoft(R) Office Excel 2003 SP 1 (Excel (c) 1985-2003 Microsoft Corporation). Statistica Version 10 (copyright (c) Stat Soft, Inc. 1984-2011) was used to calculate the descriptive statistics. RESULTS: The main finding of the study was that nearly 70% of the respondents who purchased supplements were strongly influenced by container label information that stipulated that the nutritional supplement product is free of banned substances. The second finding was that just over 50% of the respondents attached importance to the quality of the nutritional supplement product information on the container label. The third finding was that about 40% of the respondents were strongly influenced by the ingredients on the labels when they purchased nutritional supplements. CONCLUSION: This study, (i) identifies short-comings in current labelling information practices, (ii) provides opportunities to improve label and non-label information and communication, and, (iii) presents the case for quality assurance laboratory "screening testing" of declared and undeclared contaminants and/or adulterants, that could have negative consequences to the consumer. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1475-2891-12-133 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Nutrition Journal LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Nutritional supplement products: does the label information influence purchasing decisions for the physically active? TI - Nutritional supplement products: does the label information influence purchasing decisions for the physically active? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15251 ER - en_ZA


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This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License