The trophy hunting of African lions: scale, current management practices and factors undermining sustainability

 

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dc.contributor.author Lindsey, Peter Andrew en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Balme, Guy Andrew en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Funston, Paul en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Henschel, Philipp en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Hunter, Luke en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Madzikanda, Hilary en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Midlane, Neil en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Nyirenda, Vincent en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-18T07:12:54Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-18T07:12:54Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Lindsey, P. A., Balme, G. A., Funston, P., Henschel, P., Hunter, L., Madzikanda, H., ... & Nyirenda, V. (2012). The trophy hunting of African lions: scale, current management practices and factors undermining sustainability. PloS one, 8(9), e73808-e73808. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0073808 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15150
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073808
dc.description.abstract The trophy hunting of lions Panthera leo is contentious due to uncertainty concerning conservation impacts and because of highly polarised opinions about the practice. African lions are hunted across at least ∼558,000 km 2 , which comprises 27-32% of the lion range in countries where trophy hunting of the species is permitted. Consequently, trophy hunting has potential to impart significant positive or negative impacts on lions. Several studies have demonstrated that excessive trophy harvests have driven lion population declines. There have been several attempts by protectionist non-governmental organisations to reduce or preclude trophy hunting via restrictions on the import and export of lion trophies. We document the management of lion hunting in Africa and highlight challenges which need addressing to achieve sustainability. Problems include: unscientific bases for quota setting; excessive quotas and off-takes in some countries; fixed quotas which encourage over-harvest; and lack of restrictions on the age of lions that can be hunted. Key interventions needed to make lion hunting more sustainable, include implementation of: enforced age restrictions; improved trophy monitoring; adaptive management of quotas and a minimum length of lion hunts of at least 21 days. Some range states have made important steps towards implementing such improved management and off-takes have fallen steeply in recent years. For example age restrictions have been introduced in Tanzania and in Niassa in Mozambique, and are being considered for Benin and Zimbabwe, several states have reduced quotas, and Zimbabwe is implementing trophy monitoring. However, further reforms are needed to ensure sustainability and reduce conservation problems associated with the practice while allowing retention of associated financial incentives for conservation. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_ZA
dc.rights This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and re credited. en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en_ZA
dc.source PLoS One en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://journals.plos.org/plosone en_ZA
dc.subject.other Lions en_ZA
dc.subject.other Tanzania en_ZA
dc.subject.other Wildlife en_ZA
dc.subject.other Mozambique en_ZA
dc.subject.other Zimbabwe en_ZA
dc.subject.other Hunting behavior en_ZA
dc.subject.other Zambia en_ZA
dc.subject.other Namibia en_ZA
dc.title The trophy hunting of African lions: scale, current management practices and factors undermining sustainability en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder © 2013 Lindsey et al en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Lindsey, P. A., Balme, G. A., Funston, P., Henschel, P., Hunter, L., Madzikanda, H., ... Nyirenda, V. (2013). The trophy hunting of African lions: scale, current management practices and factors undermining sustainability. <i>PLoS One</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15150 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Lindsey, Peter Andrew, Guy Andrew Balme, Paul Funston, Philipp Henschel, Luke Hunter, Hilary Madzikanda, Neil Midlane, and Vincent Nyirenda "The trophy hunting of African lions: scale, current management practices and factors undermining sustainability." <i>PLoS One</i> (2013) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15150 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Lindsey PA, Balme GA, Funston P, Henschel P, Hunter L, Madzikanda H, et al. The trophy hunting of African lions: scale, current management practices and factors undermining sustainability. PLoS One. 2013; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15150. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Lindsey, Peter Andrew AU - Balme, Guy Andrew AU - Funston, Paul AU - Henschel, Philipp AU - Hunter, Luke AU - Madzikanda, Hilary AU - Midlane, Neil AU - Nyirenda, Vincent AB - The trophy hunting of lions Panthera leo is contentious due to uncertainty concerning conservation impacts and because of highly polarised opinions about the practice. African lions are hunted across at least ∼558,000 km 2 , which comprises 27-32% of the lion range in countries where trophy hunting of the species is permitted. Consequently, trophy hunting has potential to impart significant positive or negative impacts on lions. Several studies have demonstrated that excessive trophy harvests have driven lion population declines. There have been several attempts by protectionist non-governmental organisations to reduce or preclude trophy hunting via restrictions on the import and export of lion trophies. We document the management of lion hunting in Africa and highlight challenges which need addressing to achieve sustainability. Problems include: unscientific bases for quota setting; excessive quotas and off-takes in some countries; fixed quotas which encourage over-harvest; and lack of restrictions on the age of lions that can be hunted. Key interventions needed to make lion hunting more sustainable, include implementation of: enforced age restrictions; improved trophy monitoring; adaptive management of quotas and a minimum length of lion hunts of at least 21 days. Some range states have made important steps towards implementing such improved management and off-takes have fallen steeply in recent years. For example age restrictions have been introduced in Tanzania and in Niassa in Mozambique, and are being considered for Benin and Zimbabwe, several states have reduced quotas, and Zimbabwe is implementing trophy monitoring. However, further reforms are needed to ensure sustainability and reduce conservation problems associated with the practice while allowing retention of associated financial incentives for conservation. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0073808 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - PLoS One LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - The trophy hunting of African lions: scale, current management practices and factors undermining sustainability TI - The trophy hunting of African lions: scale, current management practices and factors undermining sustainability UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15150 ER - en_ZA


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and re credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and re credited.