Motor learning: an analysis of 100 trials of a ski slalom game in children with and without developmental coordination disorder

 

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dc.contributor.author Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Jelsma, Lemke Dorothee en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Ferguson, Gillian D en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Geuze, Reint H en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-18T07:12:14Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-18T07:12:14Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Smits-Engelsman, B. C., Jelsma, L. D., Ferguson, G. D., & Geuze, R. H. (2015). Motor learning: an analysis of 100 trials of a ski slalom game in children with and without developmental coordination disorder. PloS one, 10(10), e0140470. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0140470 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15145
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0140470
dc.description.abstract Objective Although Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is often characterized as a skill acquisition deficit disorder, few studies have addressed the process of motor learning. This study examined learning of a novel motor task; the Wii Fit ski slalom game. The main objectives were to determine: 1) whether learning occurs over 100 trial runs of the game, 2) if the learning curve is different between children with and without DCD, 3) if learning is different in an easier or harder version of the task, 4) if learning transfers to other balance tasks. Method 17 children with DCD (6-10 years) and a matched control group of 17 typically developing (TD) children engaged in 20 minutes of gaming, twice a week for five weeks. Each training session comprised of alternating trial runs, with five runs at an easy level and five runs at a difficult level. Wii scores, which combine speed and accuracy per run, were recorded. Standardized balance tasks were used to measure transfer. RESULTS: Significant differences in initial performance were found between groups on the Wii score and balance tasks. Both groups improved their Wii score over the five weeks. Improvement in the easy and in the hard task did not differ between groups. Retention in the time between training sessions was not different between TD and DCD groups either. The DCD group improved significantly on all balance tasks. CONCLUSIONS: The findings in this study give a fairly coherent picture of the learning process over a medium time scale (5 weeks) in children novice to active computer games; they learn, retain and there is evidence of transfer to other balance tasks. The rate of motor learning is similar for those with and without DCD. Our results raise a number of questions about motor learning that need to be addressed in future research. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_ZA
dc.rights This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en_ZA
dc.source PLoS One en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://journals.plos.org/plosone en_ZA
dc.subject.other Children en_ZA
dc.subject.other Learning en_ZA
dc.subject.other Games en_ZA
dc.subject.other Computer games en_ZA
dc.subject.other Learning curves en_ZA
dc.subject.other Legs en_ZA
dc.subject.other Teachers en_ZA
dc.subject.other Human performance en_ZA
dc.title Motor learning: an analysis of 100 trials of a ski slalom game in children with and without developmental coordination disorder en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder © 2015 Smits-Engelsman et al en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M., Jelsma, L. D., Ferguson, G. D., & Geuze, R. H. (2015). Motor learning: an analysis of 100 trials of a ski slalom game in children with and without developmental coordination disorder. <i>PLoS One</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15145 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M, Lemke Dorothee Jelsma, Gillian D Ferguson, and Reint H Geuze "Motor learning: an analysis of 100 trials of a ski slalom game in children with and without developmental coordination disorder." <i>PLoS One</i> (2015) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15145 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Smits-Engelsman BCM, Jelsma LD, Ferguson GD, Geuze RH. Motor learning: an analysis of 100 trials of a ski slalom game in children with and without developmental coordination disorder. PLoS One. 2015; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15145. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C M AU - Jelsma, Lemke Dorothee AU - Ferguson, Gillian D AU - Geuze, Reint H AB - Objective Although Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is often characterized as a skill acquisition deficit disorder, few studies have addressed the process of motor learning. This study examined learning of a novel motor task; the Wii Fit ski slalom game. The main objectives were to determine: 1) whether learning occurs over 100 trial runs of the game, 2) if the learning curve is different between children with and without DCD, 3) if learning is different in an easier or harder version of the task, 4) if learning transfers to other balance tasks. Method 17 children with DCD (6-10 years) and a matched control group of 17 typically developing (TD) children engaged in 20 minutes of gaming, twice a week for five weeks. Each training session comprised of alternating trial runs, with five runs at an easy level and five runs at a difficult level. Wii scores, which combine speed and accuracy per run, were recorded. Standardized balance tasks were used to measure transfer. RESULTS: Significant differences in initial performance were found between groups on the Wii score and balance tasks. Both groups improved their Wii score over the five weeks. Improvement in the easy and in the hard task did not differ between groups. Retention in the time between training sessions was not different between TD and DCD groups either. The DCD group improved significantly on all balance tasks. CONCLUSIONS: The findings in this study give a fairly coherent picture of the learning process over a medium time scale (5 weeks) in children novice to active computer games; they learn, retain and there is evidence of transfer to other balance tasks. The rate of motor learning is similar for those with and without DCD. Our results raise a number of questions about motor learning that need to be addressed in future research. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0140470 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - PLoS One LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Motor learning: an analysis of 100 trials of a ski slalom game in children with and without developmental coordination disorder TI - Motor learning: an analysis of 100 trials of a ski slalom game in children with and without developmental coordination disorder UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15145 ER - en_ZA


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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.