Principlism, medical individualism, and health promotion in resource-poor countries: can autonomy-based bioethics promote social justice and population health?

 

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dc.contributor.author Azetsop, Jacquineau en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Rennie, Stuart en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-11T11:58:09Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-11T11:58:09Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Azétsop, J., & Rennie, S. (2010). Principlism, medical individualism, and health promotion in resource-poor countries: can autonomy-based bioethics promote social justice and population health. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine, 5(1), 1-10. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14881
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1747-5341-5-1
dc.description.abstract Through its adoption of the biomedical model of disease which promotes medical individualism and its reliance on the individual-based anthropology, mainstream bioethics has predominantly focused on respect for autonomy in the clinical setting and respect for person in the research site, emphasizing self-determination and freedom of choice. However, the emphasis on the individual has often led to moral vacuum, exaggeration of human agency, and a thin (liberal?) conception of justice. Applied to resource-poor countries and communities within developed countries, autonomy-based bioethics fails to address the root causes of diseases and public health crises with which individuals or communities are confronted. A sociological explanation of disease causation is needed to broaden principles of biomedical ethics and provides a renewed understanding of disease, freedom, medical practice, patient-physician relationship, risk and benefit of research and treatment, research priorities, and health policy. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
dc.rights This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_ZA
dc.source Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.peh-med.com/ en_ZA
dc.subject.other Health Justice en_ZA
dc.subject.other Relational Autonomy en_ZA
dc.subject.other Kantian Autonomy en_ZA
dc.subject.other Moral Decision Making en_ZA
dc.subject.other Social Justice en_ZA
dc.subject.other Global Bioethic en_ZA
dc.subject.other Moral Agent en_ZA
dc.subject.other Psychosocial Risk Factor en_ZA
dc.subject.other Distributive Justice en_ZA
dc.subject.other Income Inequality en_ZA
dc.subject.other HIV Preve en_ZA
dc.title Principlism, medical individualism, and health promotion in resource-poor countries: can autonomy-based bioethics promote social justice and population health? en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder 2010 Azétsop and Rennie; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Philosophy en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Azetsop, J., & Rennie, S. (2010). Principlism, medical individualism, and health promotion in resource-poor countries: can autonomy-based bioethics promote social justice and population health?. <i>Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14881 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Azetsop, Jacquineau, and Stuart Rennie "Principlism, medical individualism, and health promotion in resource-poor countries: can autonomy-based bioethics promote social justice and population health?." <i>Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine</i> (2010) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14881 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Azetsop J, Rennie S. Principlism, medical individualism, and health promotion in resource-poor countries: can autonomy-based bioethics promote social justice and population health?. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine. 2010; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14881. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Azetsop, Jacquineau AU - Rennie, Stuart AB - Through its adoption of the biomedical model of disease which promotes medical individualism and its reliance on the individual-based anthropology, mainstream bioethics has predominantly focused on respect for autonomy in the clinical setting and respect for person in the research site, emphasizing self-determination and freedom of choice. However, the emphasis on the individual has often led to moral vacuum, exaggeration of human agency, and a thin (liberal?) conception of justice. Applied to resource-poor countries and communities within developed countries, autonomy-based bioethics fails to address the root causes of diseases and public health crises with which individuals or communities are confronted. A sociological explanation of disease causation is needed to broaden principles of biomedical ethics and provides a renewed understanding of disease, freedom, medical practice, patient-physician relationship, risk and benefit of research and treatment, research priorities, and health policy. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1747-5341-5-1 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - Principlism, medical individualism, and health promotion in resource-poor countries: can autonomy-based bioethics promote social justice and population health? TI - Principlism, medical individualism, and health promotion in resource-poor countries: can autonomy-based bioethics promote social justice and population health? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14881 ER - en_ZA


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