Impact of debt relief on fiscal allocation to social priority sectors and response of social indicators in the HIPCs : a case study of Tanzania

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Tchana, Fulbert Tchana en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mollel, Lekinyi N en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-08T05:01:41Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-08T05:01:41Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mollel, L. 2009. Impact of debt relief on fiscal allocation to social priority sectors and response of social indicators in the HIPCs : a case study of Tanzania. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14725
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 60-65). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract External debt burden has been viewed as one of the key impediments to economic growth and a cause of widespread poverty in the Heavily lndebted Poor Countries (HIPCs). To join efforts of the HIPCs in ï¬ ghting poverty, the international donor community granted substantial debt relief through different initiatives including among others; unilateral bilateral agreements, the Paris Club Agreements, debt buyback schemes, the I-IIPC Initiative and its successor, the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI). All these initiatives were expected to increase public spending in social priority sectors and ultimately reduce poverty incidence in the HIPC-s. This study assesses, firstly whether the debt relief has helped to increase Government spending on education and health sectors in Tanzania and, secondly, whether increased ï¬ scal spending on the sectors has translated into improvement in the primary and secondary school enrollments and life expectancy. A system of structural equations is estimated within a Vector Autoregressive (VAR) framework. The ï¬ ndings suggest increases in Government expenditure on education and health through debt relief. Primary and secondary school enrolments improve with increased Government spending on education and health. Institutional quality is found to be signiï¬ cant in determining education spending and educational indicators. However, life expectancy was not found to respond to public Spending, possibly due to the inherent gestation period in health related indicators and quality of data used. Nevertheless, the ï¬ ndings, though based on short-run series, give an insight that in the long-run, the cumulative effects of debt relief can contribute towards successes in the ï¬ ght against poverty and ultimately attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGS). en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Applied Economics en_ZA
dc.title Impact of debt relief on fiscal allocation to social priority sectors and response of social indicators in the HIPCs : a case study of Tanzania en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Economics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MCom en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mollel, L. N. (2009). <i>Impact of debt relief on fiscal allocation to social priority sectors and response of social indicators in the HIPCs : a case study of Tanzania</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14725 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mollel, Lekinyi N. <i>"Impact of debt relief on fiscal allocation to social priority sectors and response of social indicators in the HIPCs : a case study of Tanzania."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics, 2009. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14725 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mollel LN. Impact of debt relief on fiscal allocation to social priority sectors and response of social indicators in the HIPCs : a case study of Tanzania. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics, 2009 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14725 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mollel, Lekinyi N AB - External debt burden has been viewed as one of the key impediments to economic growth and a cause of widespread poverty in the Heavily lndebted Poor Countries (HIPCs). To join efforts of the HIPCs in ï¬ ghting poverty, the international donor community granted substantial debt relief through different initiatives including among others; unilateral bilateral agreements, the Paris Club Agreements, debt buyback schemes, the I-IIPC Initiative and its successor, the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI). All these initiatives were expected to increase public spending in social priority sectors and ultimately reduce poverty incidence in the HIPC-s. This study assesses, firstly whether the debt relief has helped to increase Government spending on education and health sectors in Tanzania and, secondly, whether increased ï¬ scal spending on the sectors has translated into improvement in the primary and secondary school enrollments and life expectancy. A system of structural equations is estimated within a Vector Autoregressive (VAR) framework. The ï¬ ndings suggest increases in Government expenditure on education and health through debt relief. Primary and secondary school enrolments improve with increased Government spending on education and health. Institutional quality is found to be signiï¬ cant in determining education spending and educational indicators. However, life expectancy was not found to respond to public Spending, possibly due to the inherent gestation period in health related indicators and quality of data used. Nevertheless, the ï¬ ndings, though based on short-run series, give an insight that in the long-run, the cumulative effects of debt relief can contribute towards successes in the ï¬ ght against poverty and ultimately attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGS). DA - 2009 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2009 T1 - Impact of debt relief on fiscal allocation to social priority sectors and response of social indicators in the HIPCs : a case study of Tanzania TI - Impact of debt relief on fiscal allocation to social priority sectors and response of social indicators in the HIPCs : a case study of Tanzania UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14725 ER - en_ZA


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