Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Caron, Alexandre en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Cappelle, Julien en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Cumming, Graeme en_ZA
dc.contributor.author de Garine-Wichatitsky, Michel en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Gaidet, Nicolas en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-04T11:56:31Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-04T11:56:31Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Caron, A., Cappelle, J., Cumming, G. S., de Garine-Wichatitsky, M., & Gaidet, N. (2015). Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems. Veterinary research, 46(1), 1-11. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14679
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13567-015-0217-9
dc.description.abstract In ecology, the grouping of species into functional groups has played a valuable role in simplifying ecological complexity. In epidemiology, further clarifications of epidemiological functions are needed: while host roles may be defined, they are often used loosely, partly because of a lack of clarity on the relationships between a host's function and its epidemiological role. Here we focus on the definition of bridge hosts and their epidemiological consequences. Bridge hosts provide a link through which pathogens can be transmitted from maintenance host populations or communities to receptive populations that people want to protect (i.e., target hosts). A bridge host should (1) be competent for the pathogen or able to mechanically transmit it; and (2) come into direct contact or share habitat with both maintenance and target populations. Demonstration of bridging requires an operational framework that integrates ecological and epidemiological approaches. We illustrate this framework using the example of the transmission of Avian Influenza Viruses across wild bird/poultry interfaces in Africa and discuss a range of other examples that demonstrate the usefulness of our definition for other multi-host systems. Bridge hosts can be particularly important for understanding and managing infectious disease dynamics in multi-host systems at wildlife/domestic/human interfaces, including emerging infections. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Springer en_ZA
dc.rights This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 en_ZA
dc.source Veterinary Research en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.veterinaryresearch.org/ en_ZA
dc.subject.other Bridge Hosts en_ZA
dc.subject.other Avian Influenza Virus en_ZA
dc.title Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder 2015 Caron et al. en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Caron, A., Cappelle, J., Cumming, G., de Garine-Wichatitsky, M., & Gaidet, N. (2015). Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems. <i>Veterinary Research</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14679 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Caron, Alexandre, Julien Cappelle, Graeme Cumming, Michel de Garine-Wichatitsky, and Nicolas Gaidet "Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems." <i>Veterinary Research</i> (2015) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14679 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Caron A, Cappelle J, Cumming G, de Garine-Wichatitsky M, Gaidet N. Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems. Veterinary Research. 2015; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14679. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Caron, Alexandre AU - Cappelle, Julien AU - Cumming, Graeme AU - de Garine-Wichatitsky, Michel AU - Gaidet, Nicolas AB - In ecology, the grouping of species into functional groups has played a valuable role in simplifying ecological complexity. In epidemiology, further clarifications of epidemiological functions are needed: while host roles may be defined, they are often used loosely, partly because of a lack of clarity on the relationships between a host's function and its epidemiological role. Here we focus on the definition of bridge hosts and their epidemiological consequences. Bridge hosts provide a link through which pathogens can be transmitted from maintenance host populations or communities to receptive populations that people want to protect (i.e., target hosts). A bridge host should (1) be competent for the pathogen or able to mechanically transmit it; and (2) come into direct contact or share habitat with both maintenance and target populations. Demonstration of bridging requires an operational framework that integrates ecological and epidemiological approaches. We illustrate this framework using the example of the transmission of Avian Influenza Viruses across wild bird/poultry interfaces in Africa and discuss a range of other examples that demonstrate the usefulness of our definition for other multi-host systems. Bridge hosts can be particularly important for understanding and managing infectious disease dynamics in multi-host systems at wildlife/domestic/human interfaces, including emerging infections. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s13567-015-0217-9 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Veterinary Research LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems TI - Bridge hosts, a missing link for disease ecology in multi-host systems UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14679 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License