Teacher efficacy in primary schools : a survey of three selected schools in the Western Cape, South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Gilmour, David en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Daniels, Sandra V en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-02T10:59:41Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-02T10:59:41Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Daniels, S. 2010. Teacher efficacy in primary schools : a survey of three selected schools in the Western Cape, South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14620
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-90). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This study investigates the concept of teacher efficacy which has its origin in Bandura's (1977) self efficacy theory, which is examined in his social cognitive theory. Teacher efficacy beliefs (individual) which are hypothesized as the "beliefs in one's capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments" (Bandura, 1997:3) with the different dimensions which underpin this concept are examined. Since this study also wanted to establish the efficacy levels of the schools as a unit, the concept of collective efficacy was explored. The purpose of this research is two-fold. Firstly, the aim is to construct a better understanding of the conceptual underpinnings of teacher efficacy, and secondly, it aims to measure and compare teachers' levels of efficacy in three selected schools. The selection of these schools for this study was based on the results these schools obtained in the Literacy and Numeracy Systemic Evaluations conducted by the Provincial and National Departments of Education. The rationale is to determine whether or not a relation exists between teachers' levels of efficacy, and by extension whether or not it influences what they do in their classrooms and their learners' achievements. Tschannen-Moran et al's (1998) original 31-item instrument probing the aspects of teacher efficacy was used to measure (individual) teacher efficacy, and Tschannen- Moran and Ban's (2004) instrument, The Collective Teacher Belief Scale, was used to measure and determine the schools' collective sense of efficacy. The research showed a relationship between teachers' levels of efficacy, what they do in their classrooms and their schools and by extension their learners' achievement. Although the causal mechanism of this relationship was not established, nor was it part of the study, the research confirms that even though teachers' sense of efficacy is not necessarily homogeneous across the various types of tasks they are asked to perform, each of the aspects of teacher efficacy is positively related to teachers' levels of confidence about their capabilities at each of the three schools. At the schools where teachers seem to be positively inclined and more efficacious, the results are better, while the converse is applicable at the school where the propensity towards negativity is more prevalent. What is also clear is that the beliefs teachers have about their abilities (teacher self efficacy), influences their persistence when things do not go smoothly, and that ultimately this affects the learners. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Education en_ZA
dc.title Teacher efficacy in primary schools : a survey of three selected schools in the Western Cape, South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Education en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MEd en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Daniels, S. V. (2010). <i>Teacher efficacy in primary schools : a survey of three selected schools in the Western Cape, South Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14620 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Daniels, Sandra V. <i>"Teacher efficacy in primary schools : a survey of three selected schools in the Western Cape, South Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education, 2010. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14620 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Daniels SV. Teacher efficacy in primary schools : a survey of three selected schools in the Western Cape, South Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,School of Education, 2010 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14620 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Daniels, Sandra V AB - This study investigates the concept of teacher efficacy which has its origin in Bandura's (1977) self efficacy theory, which is examined in his social cognitive theory. Teacher efficacy beliefs (individual) which are hypothesized as the "beliefs in one's capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments" (Bandura, 1997:3) with the different dimensions which underpin this concept are examined. Since this study also wanted to establish the efficacy levels of the schools as a unit, the concept of collective efficacy was explored. The purpose of this research is two-fold. Firstly, the aim is to construct a better understanding of the conceptual underpinnings of teacher efficacy, and secondly, it aims to measure and compare teachers' levels of efficacy in three selected schools. The selection of these schools for this study was based on the results these schools obtained in the Literacy and Numeracy Systemic Evaluations conducted by the Provincial and National Departments of Education. The rationale is to determine whether or not a relation exists between teachers' levels of efficacy, and by extension whether or not it influences what they do in their classrooms and their learners' achievements. Tschannen-Moran et al's (1998) original 31-item instrument probing the aspects of teacher efficacy was used to measure (individual) teacher efficacy, and Tschannen- Moran and Ban's (2004) instrument, The Collective Teacher Belief Scale, was used to measure and determine the schools' collective sense of efficacy. The research showed a relationship between teachers' levels of efficacy, what they do in their classrooms and their schools and by extension their learners' achievement. Although the causal mechanism of this relationship was not established, nor was it part of the study, the research confirms that even though teachers' sense of efficacy is not necessarily homogeneous across the various types of tasks they are asked to perform, each of the aspects of teacher efficacy is positively related to teachers' levels of confidence about their capabilities at each of the three schools. At the schools where teachers seem to be positively inclined and more efficacious, the results are better, while the converse is applicable at the school where the propensity towards negativity is more prevalent. What is also clear is that the beliefs teachers have about their abilities (teacher self efficacy), influences their persistence when things do not go smoothly, and that ultimately this affects the learners. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - Teacher efficacy in primary schools : a survey of three selected schools in the Western Cape, South Africa TI - Teacher efficacy in primary schools : a survey of three selected schools in the Western Cape, South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14620 ER - en_ZA


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