Psychology interns' experiences of working with survivors of violence at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Kaminer, Debbie en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Casson-Crook, Martine en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-02T10:59:04Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-02T10:59:04Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Casson-Crook, M. 2010. Psychology interns' experiences of working with survivors of violence at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14615
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves110-126). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract South Africa has very high rates of violence and many people who are treated within psychiatric hospitals have been exposed to interpersonal violence. However little has been documented about trauma interventions in the South African context. Twelve clinical psychology interns completing the second year of their clinical masters training at Valkenberg, Groote Schuur and Lentegeur Hospitals were interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed according to grounded theory methodology, in order to establish: the kinds of violent experiences to which patients are exposed; patients' presenting complaints and diagnostic trends that were noticed amongst patients; the therapeutic work that is being undertaken with patients by interns and the theoretical models on which their work is based; the various challenges that interns encounter in their work with survivors of violence, and the training issues that arose for interns during the course of their work. The findings were compared with the available literature regarding the impact of exposure to violence and models of intervention, which is based predominantly on research conducted in economically developed countries. It was established that rates of exposure to violence are very high amongst the psychiatric patients seen by these interns and multiple traumatisation was felt to contribute to the complexity of their patients' presentations. Despite having received some training in working with survivors of violence during the course of their generalist training, interns felt ill- equipped to work with many of these patients because of the degree of complexity of patients' problems, including the contextual issues which continue to impact on patients. Most interns reported that they would have benefited from more specialist training. Existing theoretical models formed the basis for the interns' understanding of the psychological impact of exposure to violence but established intervention models were felt to be mostly inadequate with this patient population. In light of these findings areas for further consideration and research are suggested. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Clinical Psychology en_ZA
dc.title Psychology interns' experiences of working with survivors of violence at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Casson-Crook, M. (2010). <i>Psychology interns' experiences of working with survivors of violence at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14615 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Casson-Crook, Martine. <i>"Psychology interns' experiences of working with survivors of violence at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2010. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14615 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Casson-Crook M. Psychology interns' experiences of working with survivors of violence at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2010 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14615 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Casson-Crook, Martine AB - South Africa has very high rates of violence and many people who are treated within psychiatric hospitals have been exposed to interpersonal violence. However little has been documented about trauma interventions in the South African context. Twelve clinical psychology interns completing the second year of their clinical masters training at Valkenberg, Groote Schuur and Lentegeur Hospitals were interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded and analysed according to grounded theory methodology, in order to establish: the kinds of violent experiences to which patients are exposed; patients' presenting complaints and diagnostic trends that were noticed amongst patients; the therapeutic work that is being undertaken with patients by interns and the theoretical models on which their work is based; the various challenges that interns encounter in their work with survivors of violence, and the training issues that arose for interns during the course of their work. The findings were compared with the available literature regarding the impact of exposure to violence and models of intervention, which is based predominantly on research conducted in economically developed countries. It was established that rates of exposure to violence are very high amongst the psychiatric patients seen by these interns and multiple traumatisation was felt to contribute to the complexity of their patients' presentations. Despite having received some training in working with survivors of violence during the course of their generalist training, interns felt ill- equipped to work with many of these patients because of the degree of complexity of patients' problems, including the contextual issues which continue to impact on patients. Most interns reported that they would have benefited from more specialist training. Existing theoretical models formed the basis for the interns' understanding of the psychological impact of exposure to violence but established intervention models were felt to be mostly inadequate with this patient population. In light of these findings areas for further consideration and research are suggested. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - Psychology interns' experiences of working with survivors of violence at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town TI - Psychology interns' experiences of working with survivors of violence at psychiatric hospitals in Cape Town UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14615 ER - en_ZA


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