Essays on the political economy of 20th century colonisation and decolonisation in Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Fedderke, Johannes en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Viegi, Nicola en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Agbor, Julius Agbor en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-02T10:56:54Z
dc.date.available 2015-11-02T10:56:54Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Agbor, J. 2010. Essays on the political economy of 20th century colonisation and decolonisation in Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14609
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 133-141). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The focus of this dissertation is on colonisation and decolonisation as cornerstones in the development of sub-Saharan Africa's current institutions and how these historical institutions affect current economic growth outcomes. The dissertation consists of three main chapters besides the introductory and concluding chapters. The rst main chapter considers conditions of optimality in a co-optive strategy of colonial rule. It proposes a simple model of elite formation emanating from a coloniser's quest to maximise extracted rents from its colonies... In the second main chapter, I argue that the pattern of decolonisation in West Africa was a function of the nature of human capital transfers from the colonisers to the indigenous elites of the former colonies. Underpinning the nature of these human capital transfers is the colonial educational ideology... The third main chapter investigates the channels through which colonial origin affects economic outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It focuses on four key channels of transmission namely, human capital, trade openness, market distortion and selection bias. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Economics en_ZA
dc.subject.other Multiple Equilibria, Governance technology, human capital, elite, productivity en_ZA
dc.title Essays on the political economy of 20th century colonisation and decolonisation in Africa en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Economics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Agbor, J. A. (2010). <i>Essays on the political economy of 20th century colonisation and decolonisation in Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14609 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Agbor, Julius Agbor. <i>"Essays on the political economy of 20th century colonisation and decolonisation in Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics, 2010. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14609 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Agbor JA. Essays on the political economy of 20th century colonisation and decolonisation in Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Economics, 2010 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14609 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Agbor, Julius Agbor AB - The focus of this dissertation is on colonisation and decolonisation as cornerstones in the development of sub-Saharan Africa's current institutions and how these historical institutions affect current economic growth outcomes. The dissertation consists of three main chapters besides the introductory and concluding chapters. The rst main chapter considers conditions of optimality in a co-optive strategy of colonial rule. It proposes a simple model of elite formation emanating from a coloniser's quest to maximise extracted rents from its colonies... In the second main chapter, I argue that the pattern of decolonisation in West Africa was a function of the nature of human capital transfers from the colonisers to the indigenous elites of the former colonies. Underpinning the nature of these human capital transfers is the colonial educational ideology... The third main chapter investigates the channels through which colonial origin affects economic outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It focuses on four key channels of transmission namely, human capital, trade openness, market distortion and selection bias. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - Essays on the political economy of 20th century colonisation and decolonisation in Africa TI - Essays on the political economy of 20th century colonisation and decolonisation in Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14609 ER - en_ZA


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