Biomedical research, a tool to address the health issues that affect African populations

 

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dc.contributor.author Peprah, Emmanuel en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Wonkam, Ambroise en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-30T09:33:30Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-30T09:33:30Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Peprah, E., & Wonkam, A. (2013). Biomedical research, a tool to address the health issues that affect African populations. Global Health, 9, 50. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14523
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1744-8603-9-50
dc.description.abstract Traditionally, biomedical research endeavors in low to middle resources countries have focused on communicable diseases. However, data collected over the past 20years by the World Health Organization (WHO) show a significant increase in the number of people suffering from non-communicable diseases (e.g. heart disease, diabetes, cancer and pulmonary diseases). Within the coming years, WHO predicts significant decreases in communicable diseases while non-communicable diseases are expected to double in low and middle income countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The predicted increase in the non-communicable diseases population could be economically burdensome for the basic healthcare infrastructure of countries that lack resources to address this emerging disease burden. Biomedical research could stimulate development of healthcare and biomedical infrastructure. If this development is sustainable, it provides an opportunity to alleviate the burden of both communicable and non-communicable diseases through diagnosis, prevention and treatment. In this paper, we discuss how research using biomedical technology, especially genomics, has produced data that enhances the understanding and treatment of both communicable and non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. We further discuss how scientific development can provide opportunities to pursue research areas responsive to the African populations. We limit our discussion to biomedical research in the areas of genomics due to its substantial impact on the scientific community in recent years however, we also recognize that targeted investments in other scientific disciplines could also foster further development in African countries. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
dc.rights This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_ZA
dc.source Globalization and Health en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/ en_ZA
dc.subject.other Genomics en_ZA
dc.subject.other Biomedical en_ZA
dc.subject.other Research en_ZA
dc.subject.other Africa en_ZA
dc.subject.other Development en_ZA
dc.subject.other Policy en_ZA
dc.title Biomedical research, a tool to address the health issues that affect African populations en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder 2013 Peprah and Wonkam; licensee BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Human Genetics en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Peprah, E., & Wonkam, A. (2013). Biomedical research, a tool to address the health issues that affect African populations. <i>Globalization and Health</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14523 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Peprah, Emmanuel, and Ambroise Wonkam "Biomedical research, a tool to address the health issues that affect African populations." <i>Globalization and Health</i> (2013) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14523 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Peprah E, Wonkam A. Biomedical research, a tool to address the health issues that affect African populations. Globalization and Health. 2013; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14523. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Peprah, Emmanuel AU - Wonkam, Ambroise AB - Traditionally, biomedical research endeavors in low to middle resources countries have focused on communicable diseases. However, data collected over the past 20years by the World Health Organization (WHO) show a significant increase in the number of people suffering from non-communicable diseases (e.g. heart disease, diabetes, cancer and pulmonary diseases). Within the coming years, WHO predicts significant decreases in communicable diseases while non-communicable diseases are expected to double in low and middle income countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The predicted increase in the non-communicable diseases population could be economically burdensome for the basic healthcare infrastructure of countries that lack resources to address this emerging disease burden. Biomedical research could stimulate development of healthcare and biomedical infrastructure. If this development is sustainable, it provides an opportunity to alleviate the burden of both communicable and non-communicable diseases through diagnosis, prevention and treatment. In this paper, we discuss how research using biomedical technology, especially genomics, has produced data that enhances the understanding and treatment of both communicable and non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. We further discuss how scientific development can provide opportunities to pursue research areas responsive to the African populations. We limit our discussion to biomedical research in the areas of genomics due to its substantial impact on the scientific community in recent years however, we also recognize that targeted investments in other scientific disciplines could also foster further development in African countries. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1744-8603-9-50 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Globalization and Health LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Biomedical research, a tool to address the health issues that affect African populations TI - Biomedical research, a tool to address the health issues that affect African populations UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14523 ER - en_ZA


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