Prevalence, comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda

 

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dc.contributor.author Abbo, Catherine en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Kinyanda, Eugene en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Kizza, Ruth en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Levin, Jonathan en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Ndyanabangi, Sheilla en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Stein, Dan en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-30T09:28:02Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-30T09:28:02Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Abbo, C., Kinyanda, E., Kizza, R. B., Levin, J., Ndyanabangi, S., & Stein, D. J. (2013). Prevalence, comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda. Child and adolescent psychiatry and mental health, 7(1), 21. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14500
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1753-2000-7-21
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND:Child and adolescent anxiety disorders are the most prevalent form of childhood psychopathology. Research on child and adolescent anxiety disorders has predominantly been done in westernized societies. There is a paucity of data on the prevalence, comorbidity, and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in non-western societies including those in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper investigates the prevalence, comorbidity, and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in north-eastern Uganda.OBJECTIVE:To determine the prevalence of DSM-IV anxiety disorders, as well as comorbidity patterns and predictors in children and adolescents aged 3 to 19 years in north-eastern Uganda. METHODS: Four districts (Lira, Tororo, Kaberamaido and Gulu) in rural north-eastern Uganda participated in this study. Using a multi-stage sampling procedure, a sample of 420 households with children aged 3-19 years from each district was enrolled into the study. The MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview for children and adolescents (MINI KID) was used to assess for psychiatric disorders in 1587 of 1680 respondents. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety disorders was 26.6%, with rates higher in females (29.7%) than in males (23.1%). The most common disorders in both males and females were specific phobia (15.8%), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (6.6%) and separation anxiety disorder (5.8%). Children below 5 years of age were significantly more likely to have separation anxiety disorder and specific phobias, while those aged between 14-19 were significantly more likely to have PTSD. Anxiety disorders were more prevalent among respondents with other psychiatric disorders; in respondents with two or more co-morbid psychiatric disorders the prevalence of anxiety disorders was 62.1%. Predictors of anxiety disorders were experience of war trauma (OR=1.93, p<0.001) and a higher score on the emotional symptom scale of the SDQ (OR=2.58, p<0.001). Significant socio-demograghic associations of anxiety disorders were found for female gender, guardian unemployment, living in permanent housing, living without parents, and having parents without education. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda is high, but consistent in terms of gender ratio and progression over time with a range of prior work in other contexts. Patterns of comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in this setting are also broadly consistent with previous findings from western community studies. Both psychosocial stressors and exposure to war trauma are significant predictors of anxiety disorders.Prevention and treatment strategies need to be put in place to address the high prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in Uganda. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
dc.rights This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_ZA
dc.source Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.capmh.com/ en_ZA
dc.subject.other Anxiety disorders en_ZA
dc.subject.other Comorbidity en_ZA
dc.subject.other Predictors en_ZA
dc.subject.other Uganda en_ZA
dc.title Prevalence, comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder 2013 Abbo et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Abbo, C., Kinyanda, E., Kizza, R., Levin, J., Ndyanabangi, S., & Stein, D. (2013). Prevalence, comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda. <i>Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14500 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Abbo, Catherine, Eugene Kinyanda, Ruth Kizza, Jonathan Levin, Sheilla Ndyanabangi, and Dan Stein "Prevalence, comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda." <i>Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health</i> (2013) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14500 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Abbo C, Kinyanda E, Kizza R, Levin J, Ndyanabangi S, Stein D. Prevalence, comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health. 2013; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14500. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Abbo, Catherine AU - Kinyanda, Eugene AU - Kizza, Ruth AU - Levin, Jonathan AU - Ndyanabangi, Sheilla AU - Stein, Dan AB - BACKGROUND:Child and adolescent anxiety disorders are the most prevalent form of childhood psychopathology. Research on child and adolescent anxiety disorders has predominantly been done in westernized societies. There is a paucity of data on the prevalence, comorbidity, and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in non-western societies including those in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper investigates the prevalence, comorbidity, and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in north-eastern Uganda.OBJECTIVE:To determine the prevalence of DSM-IV anxiety disorders, as well as comorbidity patterns and predictors in children and adolescents aged 3 to 19 years in north-eastern Uganda. METHODS: Four districts (Lira, Tororo, Kaberamaido and Gulu) in rural north-eastern Uganda participated in this study. Using a multi-stage sampling procedure, a sample of 420 households with children aged 3-19 years from each district was enrolled into the study. The MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview for children and adolescents (MINI KID) was used to assess for psychiatric disorders in 1587 of 1680 respondents. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety disorders was 26.6%, with rates higher in females (29.7%) than in males (23.1%). The most common disorders in both males and females were specific phobia (15.8%), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (6.6%) and separation anxiety disorder (5.8%). Children below 5 years of age were significantly more likely to have separation anxiety disorder and specific phobias, while those aged between 14-19 were significantly more likely to have PTSD. Anxiety disorders were more prevalent among respondents with other psychiatric disorders; in respondents with two or more co-morbid psychiatric disorders the prevalence of anxiety disorders was 62.1%. Predictors of anxiety disorders were experience of war trauma (OR=1.93, p<0.001) and a higher score on the emotional symptom scale of the SDQ (OR=2.58, p<0.001). Significant socio-demograghic associations of anxiety disorders were found for female gender, guardian unemployment, living in permanent housing, living without parents, and having parents without education. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda is high, but consistent in terms of gender ratio and progression over time with a range of prior work in other contexts. Patterns of comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in this setting are also broadly consistent with previous findings from western community studies. Both psychosocial stressors and exposure to war trauma are significant predictors of anxiety disorders.Prevention and treatment strategies need to be put in place to address the high prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in Uganda. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1753-2000-7-21 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Prevalence, comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda TI - Prevalence, comorbidity and predictors of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents in rural north-eastern Uganda UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14500 ER - en_ZA


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