Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Smuts, Heidi en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Workman, Lesley en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Zar, Heather en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-28T06:45:36Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-28T06:45:36Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Smuts, H. E., Workman, L. J., & Zar, H. J. (2011). Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing. BMC infectious diseases, 11(1), 65. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14423
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-11-65
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND:Infections caused by human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are important triggers of wheezing in young children. Wheezy illness has increasingly been recognised as an important cause of morbidity in African children, but there is little information on the contribution of HRV to this. The aim of this study was to determine the role of HRV as a cause of acute wheezing in South African children. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty children presenting consecutively at a tertiary children's hospital with a wheezing illness from May 2004 to November 2005 were prospectively enrolled. A nasal swab was taken and reverse transcription PCR used to screen the samples for HRV. The presence of human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus and human coronavirus-NL63 was assessed in all samples using PCR-based assays. A general shell vial culture using a pool of monoclonal antibodies was used to detect other common respiratory viruses on 26% of samples. Phylogenetic analysis to determine circulating HRV species was performed on a portion of HRV-positive samples. Categorical characteristics were analysed using Fisher's Exact test. RESULTS: HRV was detected in 128 (58.2%) of children, most (72%) of whom were under 2 years of age. Presenting symptoms between the HRV-positive and negative groups were similar. Most illness was managed with ambulatory therapy, but 45 (35%) were hospitalized for treatment and 3 (2%) were admitted to intensive care. There were no in-hospital deaths. All 3 species of HRV were detected with HRV-C being the most common (52%) followed by HRV-A (37%) and HRV-B (11%). Infection with other respiratory viruses occurred in 20/128 (16%) of HRV-positive children and in 26/92 (28%) of HRV-negative samples. CONCLUSION: HRV may be the commonest viral infection in young South African children with acute wheezing. Infection is associated with mild or moderate clinical disease. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
dc.rights This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_ZA
dc.source BMC Infectious Diseases en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/ en_ZA
dc.subject.other Human bocavirus en_ZA
dc.subject.other Metapneumovirus en_ZA
dc.subject.other Picornaviridae Infections en_ZA
dc.subject.other Polymerase Chain Reaction en_ZA
dc.title Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.rights.holder 2011 Smuts et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Virology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Smuts, H., Workman, L., & Zar, H. (2011). Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing. <i>BMC Infectious Diseases</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14423 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Smuts, Heidi, Lesley Workman, and Heather Zar "Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing." <i>BMC Infectious Diseases</i> (2011) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14423 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Smuts H, Workman L, Zar H. Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing. BMC Infectious Diseases. 2011; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14423. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Smuts, Heidi AU - Workman, Lesley AU - Zar, Heather AB - BACKGROUND:Infections caused by human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are important triggers of wheezing in young children. Wheezy illness has increasingly been recognised as an important cause of morbidity in African children, but there is little information on the contribution of HRV to this. The aim of this study was to determine the role of HRV as a cause of acute wheezing in South African children. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty children presenting consecutively at a tertiary children's hospital with a wheezing illness from May 2004 to November 2005 were prospectively enrolled. A nasal swab was taken and reverse transcription PCR used to screen the samples for HRV. The presence of human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus and human coronavirus-NL63 was assessed in all samples using PCR-based assays. A general shell vial culture using a pool of monoclonal antibodies was used to detect other common respiratory viruses on 26% of samples. Phylogenetic analysis to determine circulating HRV species was performed on a portion of HRV-positive samples. Categorical characteristics were analysed using Fisher's Exact test. RESULTS: HRV was detected in 128 (58.2%) of children, most (72%) of whom were under 2 years of age. Presenting symptoms between the HRV-positive and negative groups were similar. Most illness was managed with ambulatory therapy, but 45 (35%) were hospitalized for treatment and 3 (2%) were admitted to intensive care. There were no in-hospital deaths. All 3 species of HRV were detected with HRV-C being the most common (52%) followed by HRV-A (37%) and HRV-B (11%). Infection with other respiratory viruses occurred in 20/128 (16%) of HRV-positive children and in 26/92 (28%) of HRV-negative samples. CONCLUSION: HRV may be the commonest viral infection in young South African children with acute wheezing. Infection is associated with mild or moderate clinical disease. DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1471-2334-11-65 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Infectious Diseases LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2011 T1 - Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing TI - Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14423 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License