Muslim common religious practices at the Cape : identification and analysis

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Hofmeyr, Jannie en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mukadam, Ahmed en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-28T05:39:51Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-28T05:39:51Z
dc.date.issued 1990 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mukadam, A. 1990. Muslim common religious practices at the Cape : identification and analysis. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14407
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 92-96. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This dissertation examines the side by side existence of Popular Islam, or Muslim Common Religious Practices, with Official Islam in the Cape of today. Our task is thus primarily to identify the popular movement as no systematic documentation in this field has to date been attempted. Almost all approaches in Islamic Studies have concentrated an Official Islam and mostly from theological perspectives. In those works references to particular common beliefs and practices have been made and sometimes suggestively. Comparatively, however, much more, and perhaps methodologically not enough, has been done in Christian studies under the headings of Popular Religion, African Christology and very importantly, African Indigenous Church movements. The academic study of Islam, however, is still a relative novelty in South Africa and we suspect that the area of research into the popular movement may not gather momentum as rapidly as studies on the official movement. This apathy towards this "invisible institution" is attributable to the marginality it receives as a religious response. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Islam - South Africa - Cape of Good Hope - Customs and practices en_ZA
dc.title Muslim common religious practices at the Cape : identification and analysis en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Religious Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mukadam, A. (1990). <i>Muslim common religious practices at the Cape : identification and analysis</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14407 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mukadam, Ahmed. <i>"Muslim common religious practices at the Cape : identification and analysis."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies, 1990. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14407 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mukadam A. Muslim common religious practices at the Cape : identification and analysis. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Religious Studies, 1990 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14407 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mukadam, Ahmed AB - This dissertation examines the side by side existence of Popular Islam, or Muslim Common Religious Practices, with Official Islam in the Cape of today. Our task is thus primarily to identify the popular movement as no systematic documentation in this field has to date been attempted. Almost all approaches in Islamic Studies have concentrated an Official Islam and mostly from theological perspectives. In those works references to particular common beliefs and practices have been made and sometimes suggestively. Comparatively, however, much more, and perhaps methodologically not enough, has been done in Christian studies under the headings of Popular Religion, African Christology and very importantly, African Indigenous Church movements. The academic study of Islam, however, is still a relative novelty in South Africa and we suspect that the area of research into the popular movement may not gather momentum as rapidly as studies on the official movement. This apathy towards this "invisible institution" is attributable to the marginality it receives as a religious response. DA - 1990 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1990 T1 - Muslim common religious practices at the Cape : identification and analysis TI - Muslim common religious practices at the Cape : identification and analysis UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14407 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record