Psychosocial discourse and the "new" reproductive technologies : a critical analysis

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Swartz, Leslie en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Brokensha, Steven en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-25T17:08:17Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-25T17:08:17Z
dc.date.issued 1989 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Brokensha, S. 1989. Psychosocial discourse and the "new" reproductive technologies : a critical analysis. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14320
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 47-53. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The "new" reproductive technologies (NRTs) have gathered substantial momentum in recent years. 'Psychological' discourse on these techniques has tended towards uncritical preoccupation with intra-individual, constitutional factors, and has ignored the sociocultural, political and economic contexts of these practices. Within an inter-disciplinary, social-constructionist framework, this study presents a feminist critique of the NRTs in which they are argued to be biopsychosocially noxious to women. Modern biomedicine's appropriation and ownership of infertility as "disease" is argued to be consistent with the agendas of capitalism and patriarchy. Results of fieldwork within a particular medical setting are presented to develop a hermeneutic of the discursive interface between medical gatekeepers and the applicant 'patients' with whom they negotiate treatment. In a concluding section a dominant theme in gatekeepers' talk, "the well-being of the child", is ideologically analyzed; women-centered strategies are briefly discussed; and implications for the interface between psychology and reproductive technology are drawn. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Human reproductive technology - Social aspects en_ZA
dc.subject.other Human reproductive technology - Psychological aspects en_ZA
dc.subject.other Clinical Psychology en_ZA
dc.title Psychosocial discourse and the "new" reproductive technologies : a critical analysis en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Brokensha, S. (1989). <i>Psychosocial discourse and the "new" reproductive technologies : a critical analysis</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14320 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Brokensha, Steven. <i>"Psychosocial discourse and the "new" reproductive technologies : a critical analysis."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 1989. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14320 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Brokensha S. Psychosocial discourse and the "new" reproductive technologies : a critical analysis. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 1989 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14320 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Brokensha, Steven AB - The "new" reproductive technologies (NRTs) have gathered substantial momentum in recent years. 'Psychological' discourse on these techniques has tended towards uncritical preoccupation with intra-individual, constitutional factors, and has ignored the sociocultural, political and economic contexts of these practices. Within an inter-disciplinary, social-constructionist framework, this study presents a feminist critique of the NRTs in which they are argued to be biopsychosocially noxious to women. Modern biomedicine's appropriation and ownership of infertility as "disease" is argued to be consistent with the agendas of capitalism and patriarchy. Results of fieldwork within a particular medical setting are presented to develop a hermeneutic of the discursive interface between medical gatekeepers and the applicant 'patients' with whom they negotiate treatment. In a concluding section a dominant theme in gatekeepers' talk, "the well-being of the child", is ideologically analyzed; women-centered strategies are briefly discussed; and implications for the interface between psychology and reproductive technology are drawn. DA - 1989 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1989 T1 - Psychosocial discourse and the "new" reproductive technologies : a critical analysis TI - Psychosocial discourse and the "new" reproductive technologies : a critical analysis UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14320 ER - en_ZA


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