Games, copyright, piracy : South African gamers' perspectives

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Haupt, Adam en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Malczyk, Anna en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-25T17:06:42Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-25T17:06:42Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Malczyk, A. 2010. Games, copyright, piracy : South African gamers' perspectives. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14315
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 111-126). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines video games, copyright law and gamers' attitudes to copyright infringement, with particular reference to South Africa. The work provides an overview of the debates about copyright law and digital media, and offers an analysis of attitudes expressed by South African gamers about copyright infringement, popularly termed 'piracy'. The thesis reveals that, while about 70% of the gamers in this study share content illegally, they express complex and varying motivations for doing so, and have various and conflicting means of understanding the supposed illegality of the act. Some of the issues raised by participants in this study relate to contested perspectives on Digital Rights Management (DRM). In this work, I argue that DRM erodes civil liberties and does not necessarily extend the interests of gaming corporations. In this regard, the thesis explores alternative strategies to the restrictive approaches adopted by advocates of DRM as well as prohibitive copyright laws and multilateral agreements on intellectual property. In essence, this work intends to establish middle ground between gamers, who place a high premium on usability and affordability of gaming products, and the gaming corporations, who are interested in extending market share as well as protecting what they deem to be their intellectual property. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Intellectual Property Rights en_ZA
dc.subject.other Copyright Infringement - Attitudes en_ZA
dc.title Games, copyright, piracy : South African gamers' perspectives en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Malczyk, A. (2010). <i>Games, copyright, piracy : South African gamers' perspectives</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14315 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Malczyk, Anna. <i>"Games, copyright, piracy : South African gamers' perspectives."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2010. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14315 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Malczyk A. Games, copyright, piracy : South African gamers' perspectives. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2010 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14315 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Malczyk, Anna AB - This thesis examines video games, copyright law and gamers' attitudes to copyright infringement, with particular reference to South Africa. The work provides an overview of the debates about copyright law and digital media, and offers an analysis of attitudes expressed by South African gamers about copyright infringement, popularly termed 'piracy'. The thesis reveals that, while about 70% of the gamers in this study share content illegally, they express complex and varying motivations for doing so, and have various and conflicting means of understanding the supposed illegality of the act. Some of the issues raised by participants in this study relate to contested perspectives on Digital Rights Management (DRM). In this work, I argue that DRM erodes civil liberties and does not necessarily extend the interests of gaming corporations. In this regard, the thesis explores alternative strategies to the restrictive approaches adopted by advocates of DRM as well as prohibitive copyright laws and multilateral agreements on intellectual property. In essence, this work intends to establish middle ground between gamers, who place a high premium on usability and affordability of gaming products, and the gaming corporations, who are interested in extending market share as well as protecting what they deem to be their intellectual property. DA - 2010 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2010 T1 - Games, copyright, piracy : South African gamers' perspectives TI - Games, copyright, piracy : South African gamers' perspectives UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14315 ER - en_ZA


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