A systematic review of existing national priorities for child health research in sub-Saharan Africa

 

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dc.contributor.author Swingler, George en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Irlam, James en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Macharia, William en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Tietche, Felix en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Meremikwu, Martin en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-12T11:01:03Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-12T11:01:03Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Swingler, G. H., Irlam, J. H., Macharia, W. M., Tietche, F., & Meremikwu, M. M. (2005). A systematic review of existing national priorities for child health research in sub-Saharan Africa. Health Res Policy Syst, 3(7). en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14211
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1478-4505-3-7
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND:We systematically reviewed existing national child health research priorities in Sub-Saharan Africa, and the processes used to determine them. METHODS: Collaborators from a purposive sample of 20 WHO-AFRO Region countries, assisted by key informants from a range of governmental, non-governmental, research and funding organisations and universities, identified and located potentially eligible prioritisation documents. Included documents were those published between 1990 and 2002 from national or nationally accredited institutions describing national health research priorities for child health, alone or as part of a broader report in which children were a clearly identifiable group. Laboratory, clinical, public health and policy research were included. Two reviewers independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and extracted data. RESULTS: Eight of 33 potentially eligible reports were included. Five reports focused on limited areas of child health. The remaining three included child-specific categories in reports of general research priorities, with two such child-specific categories limited to reproductive health. In a secondary analysis of Essential National Health Research reports that included children, though not necessarily as an identifiable group, the reporting of priorities varied markedly in format and numbers of priorities listed, despite a standard recommended approach. Comparison and synthesis of reported priorities was not possible. CONCLUSION: Few systematically developed national research priorities for child health exist in sub-Saharan Africa. Children's interests may be distorted in prioritisation processes that combine all age groups. Future development of priorities requires a common reporting framework and specific consideration of childhood priorities. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
dc.rights This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_ZA
dc.source Health Research Policy and Systems en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.health-policy-systems.com en_ZA
dc.subject.other Child health research en_ZA
dc.title A systematic review of existing national priorities for child health research in sub-Saharan Africa en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Paediatrics and Child Health en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Swingler, G., Irlam, J., Macharia, W., Tietche, F., & Meremikwu, M. (2005). A systematic review of existing national priorities for child health research in sub-Saharan Africa. <i>Health Research Policy and Systems</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14211 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Swingler, George, James Irlam, William Macharia, Felix Tietche, and Martin Meremikwu "A systematic review of existing national priorities for child health research in sub-Saharan Africa." <i>Health Research Policy and Systems</i> (2005) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14211 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Swingler G, Irlam J, Macharia W, Tietche F, Meremikwu M. A systematic review of existing national priorities for child health research in sub-Saharan Africa. Health Research Policy and Systems. 2005; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14211. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Swingler, George AU - Irlam, James AU - Macharia, William AU - Tietche, Felix AU - Meremikwu, Martin AB - BACKGROUND:We systematically reviewed existing national child health research priorities in Sub-Saharan Africa, and the processes used to determine them. METHODS: Collaborators from a purposive sample of 20 WHO-AFRO Region countries, assisted by key informants from a range of governmental, non-governmental, research and funding organisations and universities, identified and located potentially eligible prioritisation documents. Included documents were those published between 1990 and 2002 from national or nationally accredited institutions describing national health research priorities for child health, alone or as part of a broader report in which children were a clearly identifiable group. Laboratory, clinical, public health and policy research were included. Two reviewers independently assessed eligibility for inclusion and extracted data. RESULTS: Eight of 33 potentially eligible reports were included. Five reports focused on limited areas of child health. The remaining three included child-specific categories in reports of general research priorities, with two such child-specific categories limited to reproductive health. In a secondary analysis of Essential National Health Research reports that included children, though not necessarily as an identifiable group, the reporting of priorities varied markedly in format and numbers of priorities listed, despite a standard recommended approach. Comparison and synthesis of reported priorities was not possible. CONCLUSION: Few systematically developed national research priorities for child health exist in sub-Saharan Africa. Children's interests may be distorted in prioritisation processes that combine all age groups. Future development of priorities requires a common reporting framework and specific consideration of childhood priorities. DA - 2005 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1478-4505-3-7 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Health Research Policy and Systems LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2005 T1 - A systematic review of existing national priorities for child health research in sub-Saharan Africa TI - A systematic review of existing national priorities for child health research in sub-Saharan Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14211 ER - en_ZA


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