Rethinking the economic costs of malaria at the household level: Evidence from applying a new analytical framework in rural Kenya

 

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dc.contributor.author Chuma, Jane en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Thiede, Michael en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Molyneux, Catherine en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-12T10:54:15Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-12T10:54:15Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Chuma, J. M., Thiede, M., & Molyneux, C. S. (2006). Rethinking the economic costs of malaria at the household level: evidence from applying a new analytical framework in rural Kenya. Malaria Journal, 5(1), 76. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14178
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-5-76
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND:Malaria imposes significant costs on households and the poor are disproportionately affected. However, cost data are often from quantitative surveys with a fixed recall period. They do not capture costs that unfold slowly over time, or seasonal variations. Few studies investigate the different pathways through which malaria contributes towards poverty. In this paper, a framework indicating the complex links between malaria, poverty and vulnerability at the household level is developed and applied using data from rural Kenya. METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys in a wet and dry season provide data on treatment-seeking, cost-burdens and coping strategies (n = 294 and n = 285 households respectively). 15 case study households purposively selected from the survey and followed for one year provide in-depth qualitative information on the links between malaria, vulnerability and poverty. RESULTS: Mean direct cost burdens were 7.1% and 5.9% of total household expenditure in the wet and dry seasons respectively. Case study data revealed no clear relationship between cost burdens and vulnerability status at the end of the year. Most important was household vulnerability status at the outset. Households reporting major malaria episodes and other shocks prior to the study descended further into poverty over the year. Wealthier households were better able to cope. CONCLUSION: The impacts of malaria on household economic status unfold slowly over time. Coping strategies adopted can have negative implications, influencing household ability to withstand malaria and other contingencies in future. To protect the poor and vulnerable, malaria control policies need to be integrated into development and poverty reduction programmes. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd en_ZA
dc.rights This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_ZA
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en_ZA
dc.source Malaria Journal en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.malariajournal.com en_ZA
dc.subject.other Health Economics en_ZA
dc.title Rethinking the economic costs of malaria at the household level: Evidence from applying a new analytical framework in rural Kenya en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Health Economics Unit en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Chuma, J., Thiede, M., & Molyneux, C. (2006). Rethinking the economic costs of malaria at the household level: Evidence from applying a new analytical framework in rural Kenya. <i>Malaria Journal</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14178 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Chuma, Jane, Michael Thiede, and Catherine Molyneux "Rethinking the economic costs of malaria at the household level: Evidence from applying a new analytical framework in rural Kenya." <i>Malaria Journal</i> (2006) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14178 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Chuma J, Thiede M, Molyneux C. Rethinking the economic costs of malaria at the household level: Evidence from applying a new analytical framework in rural Kenya. Malaria Journal. 2006; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14178. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Chuma, Jane AU - Thiede, Michael AU - Molyneux, Catherine AB - BACKGROUND:Malaria imposes significant costs on households and the poor are disproportionately affected. However, cost data are often from quantitative surveys with a fixed recall period. They do not capture costs that unfold slowly over time, or seasonal variations. Few studies investigate the different pathways through which malaria contributes towards poverty. In this paper, a framework indicating the complex links between malaria, poverty and vulnerability at the household level is developed and applied using data from rural Kenya. METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys in a wet and dry season provide data on treatment-seeking, cost-burdens and coping strategies (n = 294 and n = 285 households respectively). 15 case study households purposively selected from the survey and followed for one year provide in-depth qualitative information on the links between malaria, vulnerability and poverty. RESULTS: Mean direct cost burdens were 7.1% and 5.9% of total household expenditure in the wet and dry seasons respectively. Case study data revealed no clear relationship between cost burdens and vulnerability status at the end of the year. Most important was household vulnerability status at the outset. Households reporting major malaria episodes and other shocks prior to the study descended further into poverty over the year. Wealthier households were better able to cope. CONCLUSION: The impacts of malaria on household economic status unfold slowly over time. Coping strategies adopted can have negative implications, influencing household ability to withstand malaria and other contingencies in future. To protect the poor and vulnerable, malaria control policies need to be integrated into development and poverty reduction programmes. DA - 2006 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1475-2875-5-76 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Malaria Journal LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2006 T1 - Rethinking the economic costs of malaria at the household level: Evidence from applying a new analytical framework in rural Kenya TI - Rethinking the economic costs of malaria at the household level: Evidence from applying a new analytical framework in rural Kenya UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14178 ER - en_ZA


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