Pollinator-syndrome driven changes in the mating systems of two Cape legume species

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Midgley, Jeremy J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Nortje, G en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-15T10:33:12Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-15T10:33:12Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Nortje, G. 2013. Pollinator-syndrome driven changes in the mating systems of two Cape legume species. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14025
dc.description.abstract The challenge in answering the question of whether or not plants evolve different mating systems to accommodate their respective pollinators lies in finding a pair of closely related species differing only in pollination syndromes. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that Non-Flying Mammal Pollination (NFMP) arises from a bird pollinated ancestor as a result of their limited distributions. Liparia splendens subsp. splendens and L. parva are two genetically indistinguishable species that are thought to differ in pollination syndromes and co-occur with similar distributions, densities and have sympatric pollinators. Speculations that closely related sister species L. splendens subsp. splendens and L. parva are bird and nonflying mammal pollination (NFMP) respectively have been confirmed here. Furthermore, mating system divergence in terms of nectar volume and sugar concentration, pollen ovule rations and selfcompatibility has been investigated. There was no difference in nectar volume between the two species investigated, however, nectar concentrations have been found to be significantly higher in L. parva, which is thought to have evolved through selective pressures of pollinator preference. Similarly, pollen ovule ratios in L. parva (22663) are statistically higher than that of L. splendens subsp. splendens (17360), which is predicted to facilitate gene-flow between populations. Both species have been shown to have early-acting self-incompatible (ESI). Similar genetic variation and gene-flow of the two species in question suggest that NFMP is similar to that of bird pollination in its ability to maintain high levels of genetic diversity. The case of Liparia provides a basis to reject the hypothesis of NFMP evolution from a matrix of bird pollinated ancestors due to similar pollinator efficiencies. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.title Pollinator-syndrome driven changes in the mating systems of two Cape legume species en_ZA
dc.type Bachelor Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Nortje, G. (2013). <i>Pollinator-syndrome driven changes in the mating systems of two Cape legume species</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14025 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Nortje, G. <i>"Pollinator-syndrome driven changes in the mating systems of two Cape legume species."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14025 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Nortje G. Pollinator-syndrome driven changes in the mating systems of two Cape legume species. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14025 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Nortje, G AB - The challenge in answering the question of whether or not plants evolve different mating systems to accommodate their respective pollinators lies in finding a pair of closely related species differing only in pollination syndromes. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that Non-Flying Mammal Pollination (NFMP) arises from a bird pollinated ancestor as a result of their limited distributions. Liparia splendens subsp. splendens and L. parva are two genetically indistinguishable species that are thought to differ in pollination syndromes and co-occur with similar distributions, densities and have sympatric pollinators. Speculations that closely related sister species L. splendens subsp. splendens and L. parva are bird and nonflying mammal pollination (NFMP) respectively have been confirmed here. Furthermore, mating system divergence in terms of nectar volume and sugar concentration, pollen ovule rations and selfcompatibility has been investigated. There was no difference in nectar volume between the two species investigated, however, nectar concentrations have been found to be significantly higher in L. parva, which is thought to have evolved through selective pressures of pollinator preference. Similarly, pollen ovule ratios in L. parva (22663) are statistically higher than that of L. splendens subsp. splendens (17360), which is predicted to facilitate gene-flow between populations. Both species have been shown to have early-acting self-incompatible (ESI). Similar genetic variation and gene-flow of the two species in question suggest that NFMP is similar to that of bird pollination in its ability to maintain high levels of genetic diversity. The case of Liparia provides a basis to reject the hypothesis of NFMP evolution from a matrix of bird pollinated ancestors due to similar pollinator efficiencies. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Pollinator-syndrome driven changes in the mating systems of two Cape legume species TI - Pollinator-syndrome driven changes in the mating systems of two Cape legume species UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14025 ER - en_ZA


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