Assessing news coverage of the South African Legislative laws

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Saleh, Ibrahim en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Ndyondya, Kanyisa en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-15T10:27:33Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-15T10:27:33Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Ndyondya, K. 2013. Assessing news coverage of the South African Legislative laws. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13984
dc.description.abstract This thesis attempts to examine the news coverage of South Africa’s legislative laws passed by the Parliament, by looking at the coverage of print media using qualitative content analysis. The thesis aims to understand the dominant messages being conveyed within the news texts and reader comments, specifically whose voice was represented, who was the intended audience and what the overall tone was. The researcher argues that taking editorial positions, the control of content and toning down of the issues is determined by journalists which they consider doing such as national interest. In this geo-political context of South Africa, the engagement of media in covering the issue of legislative laws places an important area of study. It is the media that reports events, responses, criticisms etc. in relation to the legislative laws, on the basis of which various actors and concerned people make their views about the event. As well, how reporting is done, shaped, framed; what sources have been used in news; what roles journalists play in the news coverage; and how ownership of media differs in news reporting and coverage very much reflects on whether or not and to what extent the newspapers respects legislative laws are interesting questions to be answered. This study is based on the case study of the coverage of New Age and The Times. Despite journalists being expected to serve the national interest of the state, differences can be observed in coverage, reporting and providing spaces to news and articles related to New Age and The Times. This hypothesis also supports the argument projected in the thesis that there are real ideological reasons why the media do not oppose the status quo, based on ideological lens grounded by the state and reporting system could rarely go against the establishments implying to the commitment to patriotism and to the nation which the government represents (Wicker, p. 19 cited in Malek and Wiegand). en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Political Communication en_ZA
dc.title Assessing news coverage of the South African Legislative laws en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSocSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Ndyondya, K. (2013). <i>Assessing news coverage of the South African Legislative laws</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13984 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Ndyondya, Kanyisa. <i>"Assessing news coverage of the South African Legislative laws."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13984 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Ndyondya K. Assessing news coverage of the South African Legislative laws. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13984 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Ndyondya, Kanyisa AB - This thesis attempts to examine the news coverage of South Africa’s legislative laws passed by the Parliament, by looking at the coverage of print media using qualitative content analysis. The thesis aims to understand the dominant messages being conveyed within the news texts and reader comments, specifically whose voice was represented, who was the intended audience and what the overall tone was. The researcher argues that taking editorial positions, the control of content and toning down of the issues is determined by journalists which they consider doing such as national interest. In this geo-political context of South Africa, the engagement of media in covering the issue of legislative laws places an important area of study. It is the media that reports events, responses, criticisms etc. in relation to the legislative laws, on the basis of which various actors and concerned people make their views about the event. As well, how reporting is done, shaped, framed; what sources have been used in news; what roles journalists play in the news coverage; and how ownership of media differs in news reporting and coverage very much reflects on whether or not and to what extent the newspapers respects legislative laws are interesting questions to be answered. This study is based on the case study of the coverage of New Age and The Times. Despite journalists being expected to serve the national interest of the state, differences can be observed in coverage, reporting and providing spaces to news and articles related to New Age and The Times. This hypothesis also supports the argument projected in the thesis that there are real ideological reasons why the media do not oppose the status quo, based on ideological lens grounded by the state and reporting system could rarely go against the establishments implying to the commitment to patriotism and to the nation which the government represents (Wicker, p. 19 cited in Malek and Wiegand). DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Assessing news coverage of the South African Legislative laws TI - Assessing news coverage of the South African Legislative laws UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13984 ER - en_ZA


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